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A journey in cos. Glamorgan and Carmarthen; agricultural data; etc.,

A volume in the hand of Edward Williams ('Iolo Morganwg') containing accounts of a journey made by the said Edward Williams through parts of cos. Glamorgan and Carmarthen in June 1796, agricultural data, etc. P. ix is inscribed 'Agricultural Observations, &c., 1796', and p. xi 'Agricultural Observations Made in a Journey thro some Parts of Glamorgan and Caermarthenshire In June 1796 By Edward Williams'. Pp. 1-116 contain an account of the aforementioned journey, the writer setting out from the parish of Flimston, co. Glamorgan, and travelling via the parish of St. Athan, Newton Down, Pyle, Margam, Swansea, the parish of Langyvelach, Pont ar Dulais, Llanedy Forest, Llanon, Llandarog, Carmarthen, Abergwily, Llanllawddog, Glangwily, and Brechva, to Ystyffylau Carn Mountain, co. Carmarthen, and thence back via Pibwr Village, Llangyndeyrn, Llandyfaelog, Kidwely, Llanelly, Lougher, Swansea, Morris Town, the parish of Llansamled, Neath, and Pont Rhyd y Fen, to Llangynwyd. Observations are made on the topography, geology, soil, climate, vegetation, horticultural and agricultural produce and methods, local industries, mineral resources, buildings, people, etc., of the areas visited, and there are also agricultural and horticultural observations and suggestions of a more general nature arising from what the writer saw. Pp. 117-20 + 125 contain further notes being addenda to the material in pp. 1-116, and pp. 121-4 (misplaced) notes headed 'Orchards and Gardening'. Pp. 133-61 contain a section headed 'Anecdotes of Ancient Agriculture In the County of Glamorgan' which includes notes relating to ancient lime quarries and marl pits in Glamorgan, allusions to references relating to agriculture and horticulture in the works of certain Welsh bards, the Welsh laws, and other Welsh manuscripts, a reference to a 'very ancient' Welsh manuscript treatise on agriculture called 'Cynghorion Hen wr izei vab yng nghylch trin Tir a Neveilod' or 'Cato Gymraeg', and notes on the practice of alternating manures, whilst pp. 165-224 contain an incomplete section headed 'Manures' which lists eighteen 'manures of Glamorgan' and deals in great detail with the properties, results, etc., of two of these, viz. marl and lime. Pp. 237-84 contain a section dealing with the rotation of crops [? in co. Glamorgan] which outlines and comments on different schemes or courses of rotation for different soils, and pp. 285-316 contain fifty-one numbered paragraphs providing miscellaneous information and data relating to co. Glamorgan including a list of buildings, etc., attributed to Inigo Jones, notes on Frampton House, a measure called 'Mesur Llath Fleddyn', locations where astroites, trochites, alabaster, mundic, tobacco-pipe clay, and Stourbridge clay were to be found, New Margam (or Tai Bach) with the copper works and colliery located there, Melin Grufudd and the tin mills there, St. Mary Hill Down, Penlline Castle, the building of Rumney Bridge, Ffynon Gattwg, the islands called Landaff Arles in the river Tave, the locations of veins of rag lias and bastard lias, 'the several Tracts of [the] Country [of Glamorgan] and their soil', Dyffryn Goluch, and Riwperra Castle, copies of memorial inscriptions in various churches and churchyards, etc. Another or draft version of the account of the journey described on pp. 1-116 is to be found on pp. 317-80.

'Iolo Morganwg'.

Agriculture; accounts of journeys,

A volume containing general observations and instructions relating to agricultural and horticultural matters, a corpus of data relating to agricultural practices, agricultural and rural economy, animal husbandry, horticulture, and related matters in various counties in England and Wales, ?incomplete accounts of journeys in parts of Wales [by Edward Williams ('Iolo Morganwg')], and other miscellaneous items, all in the hand of the aforesaid Edward Williams ('Iolo Morganwg'). The general observations and instructions relating to agriculture and horticulture have usually been extracted from such sources as, according to the superscriptions to the notes, 'Will's Almanack, 1804', [Arthur] Young: [The Farmer's] Calendar, and [ ] Lawrence: The New Farmer's Calendar. The data relating to agricultural practices, etc., in the counties of England consists mainly of extracts from, or notes based upon, sections of the published surveys of agriculture, etc., in these counties which appeared largely under the auspices of the Board of Agriculture in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, viz. those of Jacob Malcolm and William James for rather William, James, and Jacob Malcolm] for the county of Surrey, George Turner for the county of Gloucester, John Boys for the county of Kent, John Monk for the county of Leicester, Nathaniel Kent for the county of Norfolk, Robert Lowe for the county of Nottingham, John Billingsley for the county of Somerset, and John Middleton for the county of Middlesex. The data concerning agriculture, etc., in Wales relates to the counties of South Wales. Some of this data has been extracted from, or is based upon, published agricultural surveys similar to those for the English counties also made in respect of the Welsh counties, e.g., those of Charles Hassall for the counties of Carmarthen and Pembroke, John Clark for the county of Brecknock, and Thomas Lloyd and the Reverend Mr. Turner for the county of Cardigan. It would appear, however, that most of the data relating to the counties of South Wales has not been extracted from such sources but it may possibly be linked with the work which Edward Williams ('Iolo Morganwg') himself undertook in 1796 in surveying the counties of Glamorgan and Carmarthen on behalf of the Board of Agriculture and with the work he undertook in assisting the Reverend Walter Davies ('Gwallter Mechain') in collecting material for his review of the economy of South Wales subsequently published under the title General View of the Agriculture and Domestic Economy of South Wales . . . Drawn up for the Consideration of the Board of Agriculture and Internal Improvement (London, 1815) (see the introduction for references to the assistance rendered by Edward Williams to the Reverend Walter Davies in respect of this project). Pp. 73-88 of the present manuscript contain an account of a journey undertaken [by Edward Williams] in the course of which he passed through or by the following neighbourhoods, places, buildings, etc., commenting on the features noted in brackets after the names - Penygored or Llechryd (tin works, salmon weir, coracle), Kilgeran, Cardigan, Blaen y Ffos Baptist meeting house, Fryni Vawr, Llanfernach ('a rich lead mine on the Estate of Captain Lloyd of Bronwydd worked by Lord Milford about 7 years ago . . .'), Bribwll ('a large old mansion'), Glandwr Meeting House ('very large, Independants'), Llangludwen Mill ('saw the place where they had been without any success digging for coal'), Llanboidy (adverse comments on the inhabitants of the area and also on the 'Pembrokeshire Peasantry'), Meidrym ('a decent village'), Job's Well near Caermarthen, and Gillimoor near Caerm[arthe]n Town ('100 acres of the rankest moor or bog drained by . . . Philips, Esqr.'). (continued)

Pp. 149-71 contain further notes relating to a journey [by Edward Williams] proceeding from Aber Cothi via Llanegwad, Hendre Wencyn Farm, Plas Newydd, Middleton Hall ('fine seat of Sir William Paxton . . . highly finished appartments and numerous flourishing plantations'), Grongar Hill, Dryslwyn Castle, Llanarthne, Golden Grove ('a fine old Mansion'), Llandeilo ('an ill planned and in general ill-built Town . . . some good houses . . . a large clumsy old Church', adverse comments on the inhabitants of the district, comments on a local custom of hanging jugs on nails 'all round the rooms of their houses', rather adverse comments on Dinevor Castle, Dryslwyn Castle, Carreg Cennen Castle, and the tomb of Sir Rhys ap Thomas in the church of Caermarthen), Newton Dinevor ('Fine seat of Lord Dinevor, the Park . . . one of the finest in the whole Kingdom', report on a conversation with Lord Dinevor), Derwen fawr, Aberglasney ('Mr. Dyer's, the Birth place of the Bard of Grongar Hill', praise of Grongar Hill and the views of the surrounding country to be seen from there), Crongaer Farm House, and Cross Inn (a brief note on and a sketch of 'Caermarthenshire Gates and Posts'), to Allt y Gog (a note here on 'Caermarthen Trade' with mention of 'Vaughan's anchor smithery', 'Vaughan's foundery', shipping, and ship building). Pp. 177-205 contain a further account of a journey [by Edward Williams] from Landilo ('Scattered Town with some good houses others wretched') via Dinefwr Park, Dinefor Castle, Llanfynydd village ('neat without & whitened, dirty & black within'), Glyn Cothi Mountains, Bryn Llywelyn Mountain, Llanybyddar, Llanwnen ('people most intelligent of any in Wales, mostly Presbiterians, very little English'), Cribin Clottas, Silien ('a scattered village of shabby aspect'), Langybi ('Church no Windows . . . a grammar school in the church . . . women do all the works of husbandry, threshing, grubbing, hedging . . . . have a tone or brogue that is far from pleasant . . . meeting houses numerous'), Llonio isa farm house, John's of hafod's estate, Llonio Mill, Llan Ddewi Brevi ('large double Isle Church & large village'), Tregaron New Bridge, Tregaron ('ragged Town that has a market, inferior to a Glamorgan village . . . Church large and long a clumsy high Tower, no windows in front'), House of Twm Siôn Catty ('½ mile out of town in ruins'), Llynn maes y llynn, Pont Rhyd fendigaid, Ross Fair ('4 or 5 houses only'), Yspytty ystwyth, the great bog between Tregaron & Ystrad Meuryg ('the property of Johns, Lisburne, &c., who are paid 5s per day for as much as one man can cut . . . this is called Corsgoch ar Deifi'), Ystrad Meuryg ('a dry healthy place, fine views . . .', note on E[dward] Rich[ar]ds and his school and library), Devils Bridge ('meet Messrs. Boddington & Este . . . walk over Havod grounds'), Ystrad Flur (brief note on the ruins of the abbey), dreary mountainous Country for many miles in Lanbadarn parish (' the inhabitants very stupid and extremely ignorant . . .'), foot of Pumlumon, Glasbwll village, Machynlleth ('a very good Town for Wales, many neat houses, good hall recently built. . . '), Pennegos, Dolgeiog, Llanwryn, Llancemais ('Decent Church & good village'), Mallwyd ('a very pleasant village . . . Church is a rude building with a Tower of oaken boards constructed in 1640', notes on Dr. John Davies 'the saviour of the Welsh language', his 'grammar of the Welsh language', his 'Welsh & Latin Dictionary', his revision of 'the Welsh Bible and prayer book' and his translation of 'some useful books of practical devotion into the Welsh language'), Mallwyd Bridge (sketch of bridge), Dinas ym Mowddwy ('a Market weekly but its number of houses do not exceed 30, here is a new meeting house built about 4 years ago'), Abercowarch village ('many new cottages . . . a spinning mill at work', a note here on South walians who were thronging 'to the Methodist Association at Bala' and on one young woman whom the writer had met who had come '100 miles on a pilgrimage to this circulating Mecca of Welsh fanaticism'), and Llanymowddwy, as far as Bwlch y Groes (further note on the Methodists looking forward to hearing [David] Jones of Llangan preaching at Bala). The accounts of the three journeys noted contain observations on topographical, agricultural, and geological features of the areas through which the traveller passed.

'Iolo Morganwg'.

Agriculture of Glamorgan, etc.,

A composite volume consisting of previously separate, home-made booklets containing material in the hand of Edward Williams ('Iolo Morganwg') bound into one volume). P. 11 (probably the 'title-page' of the section now paginated 13-100) is inscribed 'General View of the Agriculture of the County of Glamorgan, 1796', and is followed (pp. 13-100) by an incomplete essay on the said county [by Edward Williams]. This essay contains four chapters with sectional sub-headings 'Situation, Extent, etc.', '[Divisions and] Market Towns', 'Climate', 'Soil and Surface', 'Minerals', 'Water' (rivers, springs), 'State of Property' (mode of tenure, a list of the principal landholders), 'Buildings' (building materials, a list of the seats of landed gentry, a description of a typical farmhouse, outbuildings, cottages, etc.), 'Size of farms and character of farmers', 'Rent', and 'Tithes'. P. 101 bears the inscription 'Antiquities of Lantwit Major in the County of Glamorgan. Collected from various Documents. By Edward Williams. 1800', and is followed (pp. 105-39) by material relating to St. Illtud and the monastery and monastic school at Llanilltud, descriptions of inscribed stones at Llanilltud, and details of a twelve- point plan for setting up a committee and employing salaried research workers to supervise and undertake research for a history of the county of Glamorgan. A good deal of the material relating to Llanilltud is allegedly taken from an account compiled by the Reverend David Nichols, M.A., in 1729, and the whole of the contents of pp. 105-39 is presented in the form of a letter [from Edward Williams] to David Thomas, esqr., at Bath, 20 October 1798 (see IM, t. 307). P. 165 is inscribed 'Collection for the History of Dunraven, 1814', and is followed (pp. 169-87) by miscellaneous historical, pseudo-historical, and genealogical material relating to Dunraven Castle [co. Glamorgan] and its owners, and to Bran Vendigaid ap Llyr and his son Caradog (Caractacus) both of whom allegedly resided at Dunraven, (p. 188) an outline scheme or chapter headings for a proposed history of Dunraven Castle, and (on two unnumbered leaves between p. 188 and p. 189) a copy of a letter, ? 2 February 1818, from [Edward Williams] from Keven Cribor [co. Glamorgan], to Mrs. Wyndham of Dunraven Castle relating to the writer's research work concerning the said seat and the notes he was forwarding. Pp. 211-17 contain an incomplete copy of 'An Account of the cause of the conquest of Glamorgan by Sir Robert Fitz Haymon and his twelve Knights by Sir Edward Mansell of Margam, Knight' (for this and a fuller 'account' attributed to the same author in NLW MS 13161A (Llanover C. 74) see TLLM, tt. 200-03). P. 251 is inscribed 'List of Sheriffs and Und[er]sheriffs For the County of Glamorgan From the year 1541 To the year (blank) From a MS. in the Possession of the Revd. Mr. Davies of Wenvoe . . . 1808', and is followed ( pp. 255-71) by the said list for the period 1541-1808. Other items in the volume include extracts from a biographical dictionary (1798) relating to the English poet John Gower, Robert of Gloucester (temp. Henry II), and [Thomas] Sternhold (ob. 1549) (pp. 155-6); further notes relating to Dunraven Castle (p. 190); an extract from a letter from W. Davies to O. Jones, 1792 (p. 195); anecdotes relating to the brothers Richard and William Twrch and the building of a porch at Bewper [co. Glamorgan] (see also NLW MSS 13089E, 13103B, and IM, tt. 272-3) (pp. 205-07); a list of 'Castles in Gower' (p. 232); notes on birds (unnumbered leaf between p. 232 and p. 233); a note on the construction of a wheelbarrow (p. 233); a copy of an 'englyn' by [Edward Williams] 'Iolo Morganwg', etc. (p. 234); a copy of the inscription on the tomb of Edward Pritchard, rector of Flimnston (sic) [co. Glamorgan], ob. 1742, and his wife Margaret, ob. 1707/08, in Trefemin (Flemingston) church (p. 235); notes on Caer Fule, a Roman fortification near St. Olave's Church, Newport, and Trefela, a village in the parish of Llangwm near Usk (p. 236); a note on the rocks in Glam[organshire] (p. 237); copies of an 'englyn' and a six-line stanza of Welsh verse by [Edward Williams] 'Iolo Morganwg' (p. 238); brief notes referring to Jenkin Jones of Llangyfelach, 'minister of a Catabaptistical Congregation circa anno 1649', [William] Erbury, Walter Caradoc, Samuel Jones of Bryn Llywarch, and Morgan Llwyd (p. 239); a note on Huw Spencer, the younger, and his building activities in Glamorgan, ? temp. Edward II (p. 240); a list of Welsh superstitions ('Ofergoelion Gwlad Gymru') (p. 242 ); and notes on an outbreak of plague at Drenewydd Notais (Newton Nottage) [co. Glamorgan], circa 1620-1630 (p. 243).

'Iolo Morganwg'.

Agriculture, etc.,

A volume containing miscellaneous notes, observations, extracts from printed sources, etc., in the hand of Edward Williams ('Iolo Morganwg'), the contents, with the exception of a few literary and other items, relating almost entirely to agriculture, horticulture, botany, rural economy, and associated topics. The contents of pp. 1-252, pagination in brackets, include, inter alia, notes on the following topics, viz. sowing of haws to produce shrubs (22-5), methods of constructing hedges in Glamorgan and the various trees and shrubs which could be used for this purpose (25-31), potato planting (31), fruits in Glamorgan orchards (32-3), mazard cherry trees, chestnut trees, and wild apples (34), ancient lime quarries and marl pits on Pentrebain farm [co. Glamorgan] and the use of lime and marl as manure (35-41), and inclosing, ? in co. Glamorgan, by means of hedges and the consequent 'stair' or 'terrace' pattern to be found on 'rising grounds or uplands of easy ascent' (41-3); examples of varying courses or rotations of crops in relation to varying types of lands with notes on manuring, dressing of soil, etc., the courses being grouped as 'Old Vale Courses' and 'Gower Courses' and all presumably being related to conditions in co. Glamorgan (45-81); a note on references to types of yokes used in Wales (82); miscellaneous notes (83-8); a note on the planting of 'slips and cuttings of apple trees' in Devon and ? the Vale of Glamorgan (88-9); comments on the use of small coal-or coal slack by a Mr. Crawshay as a fertiliser (90-93); a brief comment on dissenting meeting houses in co. Glamorgan and a list of '[Glamorgan] Churches in the Mountains' (93-4); agricultural miscellanea (95-100); notes on mazard cherry trees and on the medicinal uses of salt (100-01); a list of three 'Norfolk course[s] adopted by some in Glam[organ]' (102); agricultural miscellanea (117-22); notes on 'Fish in Daw River', 'Sea fish at Aberthaw', and 'Lakes [in Glamorgan] affording fish' (122-5); a section headed 'Abstract view of Glamorgan' containing brief general observations on the soil, crops, geology, fish (in rivers and the Severn sea), landscape, seashore, appearance of villages and cottages, roads, bridges, the need for monthly markets, etc., in the county (126-31); a note on the construction of board fences for the cultivation of fruit (132); notes on references in written sources (all pre-1600) to the following in connection with Glamorgan-the existence or non-existence of inclosures, the existence of orchards and apple trees, the activities of Sir Gilbert de Clare, lord of Glamorgan, late 13th cent., in building two thousand cottages for the poor, his further activities in building village houses the upper appartments of which consisted of halls previously used for holding courts, markets, dances, etc., and then, ? in the late 18th cent., for keeping school, holding dances, meetings of benefit societies, Methodist meetings, etc., and William Herbert (Earl of Pembroke)'s action, temp. Henry VIII, in sending to France and Flanders for fruit and vegetables to restock gardens and orchards-the writers referred to including Dafydd ap Gwilym, [John] Leland, Rhys Meyrig, Ieuan ap Hywel Swrdwal, and Rhys Brydydd, and the unnamed author of 'a Ms. History in Welsh of the Lords Marchers of Glam[organ]' allegedly written in the time of Queen Mary (133-8); a list of twelve points of advantage afforded by mountainous as opposed to flat country (140-42); notes re the pruning of trees (143); notes re the saddling of cows as well as oxen to carry manure and the yoking of cows, oxen, and horses for the plough with three illustrations relating to horse yokes (144-6); comments on the possible use of coal or coal slack for manuring, experimentation in manuring, the nature of peat or bog, composts of coal or peat with lime or lime and ashes, etc. (148-55); notes relating to [rural] poverty, parish relief, and the system of parish work-houses, new proposals for a system of communal parish houses of industry 'adapted to the vale of Glamorgan or any other place where the inhabitants live in villages rather than in detached farmhouses', suggestions re free education for the children of cottagers who did not seek parish assistance in schools set up for three or four parishes and having a schoolmaster paid thirty pounds a year, proposals for holding harvest dinners, vestry meetings, and parochial markets in the hall of the parochial house of industry, and suggestions as to general principles to be observed in awarding parochial assistance which should be 'a reward in some degree at least for something meritorious' (160-75); (continued)

Brief agricultural, botanical, etc., notes headed 'Excursion to Merthyr Tidvil, May 6th 1813' (205); brief agricultural and other observations relating to certain mountains in co. Glamorgan, with a brief reference to the cessation of the iron trade in Merthyr, Aberdare, and Tredegar (206); notes relating to the nature of ? mountain soils in Glamorgan and to the manuring and dressing of soils (209-12); notes relating to crop husbandry headed 'Norfolk soils and husbandry' (213-18); and agricultural and botanical data and comments including extracts from, or notes based upon sections of, [Arthur] Young [: The Farmer's] Calendar, [Benjamin] Stillingfleet [:The] Calendar of Flora, etc. (225-45). P. 253 is inscribed 'Contents of the Agricultural Survey of the County of Glamorgan by Edward Williams 1796' and is followed on pp. 255-76 by a list of some fifty-six subject or chapter headings such as 'Geography of the County in General', 'Coal and Iron Tract', 'Metals', 'Sea Coast and Harbours . . .', 'Agricultural Produce', 'Farm Buildings', 'Implements', 'Population . . .', 'Manufactures and Trades', etc., these presumably being the main divisions of the survey referred to on p. 253. Some of these headings are accompanied by a list of the titles of sub-sections of the main heading, these in some instances amounting to over twenty in number. P. 254 contains a list of the titles of nine appendices which, presumably, were to be added to the survey. The contents of pp. 277-307 again relate mainly to agriculture, horticulture, forestry, and botany, and include extracts from, or notes based on sections of, The Transactions of the London Society for the encouragement of Arts . . ., 1798, Memoirs of the Manchester Literary and Philosophical Society, vol. V, [William] Marshall: [The] Rural Economy of the West of England, [John] Boys: [General] View of the Agriculture of the County of Kent, and [William Beeston] Coyte: Hortus Botanicus Gippovicensis. Pp. 308-24 contain material of a literary nature including transcripts of the eighteen-stanza poem entitled 'The Exile' from [Matthew Gregory] Lewis's novel The Monk, and of sonnets, etc., from Charles Lloyd: Poems on the death of Priscilla Farmer, [Mary] Robinson: Sappho and Phaon, and Brooke Boothby: Sorrows. Sacred to the Memory of Penelope, notices of books published circa 1795-1797, and brief extracts from, or brief notes on reviews of, some of these works. From p. 325 to p. 412 the contents again relate mainly to agriculture, horticulture, rural economy, and associated topics, and consist largely of extracts from, or notes based on sections of, [William] Marshall: The Rural Economy of the Midland Counties (325-?45), [John] Billingsley [: General View of the Agriculture of the County of] Somerset (353-68), [John] Clark [: General View of the Agriculture of the County of Brecknock] (369-71), and [Arthur] Young: Tour in Wales from the Annals of Agriculture, vol. 8 (385-400, with interpolations by E[dward] W[illiams]). P. 413 is headed 'Mehefin 23. Treigl o Aberhonddi hyd Drecastell' and pp.413-28 contain notes and observations in Welsh on agriculture, forestry, etc., appertaining to the area [of co. Brecknock] specified in the heading to p. 413 and also of more general relevance. Pp. 429-64 contain a brief note on the marketing of Glamorgan cattle (429); an extract from [Arthur] Young: Annals of Agriculture, vol. 32 relating to an experiment in ploughing with three different breeds of oxen, a note by E[dward] Williams on the same three breeds of oxen, and a note relating to long-legged cattle and attempts to change characteristics by cross-breeding (429-32); notes headed 'Dairy and tillage farm in Gower' (433-5); a course of crops for light soils (435); a note on Eglwysilan [co. Glamorgan] downs sheep and a wool 'manufactory' established at Caerphilly (436); a brief note re Dorsetshire sheep (436); historical notes based upon the recollections of John Spencer of Sarce [co . ], born circa 1710, relating to the introduction of clover, trefoil, rye-grass, and turnips [into Glamorgan] and to certain liming practices in the said county (437-8); a historical note, again originating from a John Spencer, relating to Aberthaw harbour [co. Glamorgan] (439); geological notes relating to petrification in white limestone, rag or grey lias, coal mines, ironstone veins, flag lias, etc., ? in co. Glamorgan (445-7); further historical notes based partly if not entirely upon the recollections of Mr. Spencer of Sarce aforesaid, ob. 1802 aged 88, relating to the introduction of clover, trefoil, rye-grass, and turnips, and of a new system of liming into Glamorgan, and to cropping and liming practices in that county (451-4 + 456); an extract from [Nathaniel] Kent: [General] View of the Agriculture of [the County of] Norfolk concerning cropping courses (455); and a further historical note, again based on information from John Spencer, relating to the aforementioned port of Aberthaw and its trade (457-8).

'Iolo Morganwg'.

Barddoniaeth Dafydd ap Gwilym ac eraill,

A composite volume containing transcripts of Welsh strict-metre poems in the hand of Edward Williams ('Iolo Morganwg'). Pp. 19-51 contain fourteen 'cywyddau' by, or attributed to, Siôn Cent, with Nos. 7, 8, and 12 attributed alternatively to Ieuan Du Dai Bowain, Thos. Derllys, and Lln. ab Howel ab Ieuan ab Gronwy respectively. Pp. 67-205 (previously paginated 1-141) contain a collection of seventy-four 'cywyddau' (No. 74 incomplete) with the general superscription 'Barddoniaeth Dafydd ap Gwilym' probably compiled by Edward Williams circa 1780 (see IMCY, tt. 7, 119, 42; see also the relevant sections of the same work for the poems or sections of poems in this group which were probably written by Edward Williams himself and attributed to Dafydd ap Gwilym). Pp. 209-454 (pp. 209-429 previously numbered 1-221) contain a corpus of approximately two hundred and fifty 'cywyddau', 'awdlau', etc., under the general superscription 'Barddoniaeth Dafydd ap Gwilym' and with a concluding note 'Diwedd Gwaith Dafydd ap Gwilym o Lyfr Mr. Owain Jones o Lanmihangel Glyn y Myfyr'. These poems are believed to have been transcribed by Edward Williams, circa 1775, from a manuscript collection of Dafydd ap Gwilym's work [now Bangor MS 6 in the library of the University College of North Wales, Bangor] compiled by Owen Jones ('Owain Myfyr') mainly from the manuscripts of Lewis and William Morris (see IMCY, tt. 3, 7; IM, t. 213; and Thomas Parry (gol.): Gwaith Dafydd ap Gwilym (Caerdydd, 1952), tt. clxv-clxix and the accompanying chart). Pp. 457-60 contain poems by, or attributed to, Siôn ap Howel ap Lln. Uchan, Siôn Cent, R. Goch o'r Yri, and Dafydd ap Edmund, and pp. 461-73 a further group of twenty-one 'cywyddau' by, or attributed to, Dafydd ap Gwilym. Some of the notes accompanying the poems in this volume are in English.

'Iolo Morganwg'.

Barddoniaeth; doethineb Catwg Ddoeth,

A composite volume containing transcripts of prose and verse items in the hand of Edward Williams ('Iolo Morganwg'). Pp. 1-80 contain transcripts of Welsh poems, almost entirely 'englynion', by, or attributed to, Llywelyn ab Rhosser 'o Sainffag[an]', Dafydd Llwyd Mathew, Dafydd ap Siencyn Fynglwyd, Richd. Watcins, vicar Llanellen, Thomas Llywelyn 'o Regoes', Llywelyn Thomas, Edwd. Dafydd 'o Fargam', Siôn y Cent, Siôn Morys 'o Lanfabon', Thomas Lewys 'o Lechau', Rhys Brychan, Hywel Bwr Bach, Huw Cae Llwyd, Dafydd Benwyn, Iorwerth Fynglwyd, Morys Cyffin, Hopcin Thomas 'o Faglan', Rhaff ab Rhobert, Siôn Tudur, Gwerfyl Mechain, Rhobert Cludro, Tudur Aled, Dafydd ap Edmwnd, Hywel ap Syr Matthew, Bleddyn Siôn 'o Lancarfan', Hywel Llwyd, Dafydd ap Gwilym, Siôn Philip 'o Hendrewaelod', Lewys Morys, Dafydd, abad Margam, Dafydd Dafies 'o Gastell Hywel', Iolo Morganwg, Huw Llwyd Cynfel, Siôn Cydewain, Llawdden, Syr Lewys Mochnant, Lewis Môn, Roger Cyffln, Syr Ifan o Garno, Wiliam Byrchinsha, Ednyfed Fychan, Cwnin Brydydd, Twm Siôn Catti, Lewys Morganwg, Rhys Brydydd, ? Lewys Glyn Cothi, Dafydd Nanmor, Jenkin Richards 'o Flaenau Gwent', Ieuan Gethin ab Ieuan ab Lleision, Siôn Brwynog, William Cynwal, Richard Huws, Dr. Morgan, esgob Llanelwy, Lewys Powel, William Middelton, Hopcin Tomas ab Einiawn, Elis Drwynhir, Harri ap Thomas ap Wiliam 'o'r Ddiserth', Grufydd Hiraethog, Morys Dwyfech, Owain Gronw, Hywel ap Rhys, Syr Lewys Gethin, Richard Cynwal, Roger y Gwydd, Edmwnd Prys, Dr. R. Davies, esgob Ty Ddewi, Rhys Cain, Huw Roberts Llun, Rhisiart Iorwerth 'o Langynwyd', ? Huw Ednyfed, Einion ap Dafydd Llwyd, Rhydderch Roberts, Syr Lewys y defaid, Syr Lewys Anwyl, Robert ab Han, Syr Ieuan Brydydd, Syr Owain ap Gwilym, Catherin ferch Howel, Wiliam Llyn, Owain Gwynedd, Dafydd Alaw, Evan Llwyd Sieffre, Morgan ap Huw Lewys, Robert Dafydd Llwyd, Wiliam ap Hywel ap Tomas, Morys Parri Llen, Ifan Siôn 'o Wedir', and Sils ap Siôn, and other unattributed poems. The inscriptions on p. 81 and p. 83 and the note on p. 82 appear to indicate that they were intended as cover and 'title-page' respectively for a home-made booklet containing a corpus of 'englynion' by Jenkin Richards of Blaenau Gwent, co. Monmouth, extracted mainly 'o Lyfrau Harri Siôn o Bont y Pwl a Llyfr ym Meddiant Rhys Thomas, Argraffydd o'r Bont Faen ym Morganwg', but only four 'englynion', presumably meant to be attributed to this poet, follow on p. 84. Pp. 91-198 contain miscellaneous items including 91-2, notes headed 'On the oldest places of Christian Worship in Wales'; (continued)

93-7, 105-06, notes, generally derogatory, on the character and literary and metallurgical activities of Lewis Morris; 100- 04, notes on 'Welsh Ideas of Celibacy'; 122-8, a transcript of thirty 'englynion' entitled 'Ymatreg Llywelyn a Gwrnerth' attributed to Tysiliaw fab Brochwel Ysgithrawc; 130, a note relating to an 'eisteddfod' held at Y Pil (Pyle, co. Glamorgan), 1740; 131- 41, notes relating to 'singing to the harp', the 'bardd telyn', carol and 'alsain' verse, the adapting of verse to music, etc.; 147-62, transcripts of 'englynion' attributed to Rhobert, Tywysog Norddmanty, Morys Kyffin, Wm. Byrchinsha, and Gutto'r Glyn, extracts from the works of various Welsh poets, etc.; 167, a version of William Midleton's introductory epistle [to his Bardhoniaeth neu brydydhiaeth, y llyfr kyntaf (Llundain, 1593)] copied 'Ex Vol. 40. Mr. Panton' [i.e. Panton MS.40 now NLW MS 2008]; 168-9, five stanzas of a hymn tune attributed to Elis Wynn; 169, a transcript of two 'englynion' attributed to Dr. [John] Davies; 171, a list of the commotes and hundreds of Glamorgan copied from '68. P.P.' [i.e. Panton MS 68 now NLW MS 2034]; 175-88, an alphabetical list of Welsh bards 'o Lyfr D'dd Ddu o'r Eryri'; and 188-98, miscellanea including transcripts of 'englynion' attributed to Siôn Mawddwy, Ieuan Tew, William Philip, and D[afydd] ab Gwilym, miscellaneous triads, genealogical data relating to various Welsh bards and Syr Rhys ap Thomas, etc. Pp. 207-390 (previously paginated 1-184) contain a collection of maxims, proverbs, triads, sayings, etc., attributed to Cattwg Ddoeth and described on a 'title-page' to the section ( p. 199) as 'Llyma Ddoethineb Cattwg Ddoeth o Lancarvan' and in a concluding note (p. 390) as 'Llyfr y cyntaf y Gwyddfardd Cyfarwydd'. In a note on the aforementioned 'title-page' (p. 199) Edward Williams claims to have transcribed this collection in 1799 from a manuscript in the possession of Siams Thomas of Maerdy Newydd, co. Glamorgan. Preceding and following the actual text of the collection are transcripts of a prefatory letter dated 1685 (pp. 201-06) and of the concluding note already referred to (p. 390) both of which are attributed to the Glamorgan scribe and copyist Thomas ab Iefan of Tre Bryn as compiler of the manuscript from which Edward Williams was allegedly copying (see TLLM, t. 172; IM, tt. 291-4). Pp. 391-477 contain a transcript of a collection, in alphabetical order, of over three thousand Welsh proverbs attributed to Cattwg Ddoeth ('Llyma Ddiarhebion Cattwg Ddoeth . . . sef yw hwnn Ail Lyfr y Gwyddfardd Cyvarwydd'). This collection, according to the aforementioned note at the end of the preceding section (p. 390) attributed to Thomas ab Iefan, had been compiled by the said Thomas from various sources and formed a continuation of the previous section. Edward Williams's claim with regard to the Siams Thomas volume is probably intended to apply to the contents of pp. 391-477 as well. The contents of pp. 199-390 have been published in The Myvyrian Archaiology of Wales . . ., vol. III (London, 1807), pp. 1-99.

'Iolo Morganwg'.

Barddoniaeth,

A composite volume containing transcripts by Edward Williams ('Iolo Morganwg') of Welsh verse in free and strict metres. P. i is inscribed 'Hen Awdlau, Caniadau, a Phennillion amrafaelion eu rhywieu er dangos amrywiold[eb] Mesurau a mydrau Cerdd Dafod Beirdd Cymru mewn oesoedd Amrafaelion a'r amrafaelion newydiadau . . . ym mhrydyddiaeth Beirdd Cymru o amser beugilydd. Cynnulliad o Hen Lyfrau Ysgrif amrafaelion gan Iolo Morganwg . . .', and this may refer to the contents of pp. 1-142 which include transcripts of poems by, or attributed to, Dafydd Llwyd Matthew, Wiliam Llyn, Bedo Brwynllys, Siôn Ceri, Wiliam Egwad, Gwilym ap Ieuan hen, Dafydd Nanmor, Sippyn Cyfeiliog, Elidir Sais, Dafydd o Lynn Nedd, Einiawn Offeiriad, Ieuan Gethin ab Ieuan ab Lleison, Dafydd ap Edmwnd, Richard Cynwal, Taliesin, Rhys Cain, Llawdden, Gwilym Tew, Dafydd Benwyn, Lewys Morganwg, Gutto'r Glynn, Siôn Mowddwy, Siôn Bradford, Rhys Nanmor, and Guttyn Owain. Pp. 143-55 (previously 1-13) contain a transcript of the first part (279 lines) of Aneurin's 'Gododdin'; pp. 159- 90 (previously 1-32), transcripts of fifteen 'cywyddau' (No. 15 incomplete) by, or attributed to, Dafydd ap Gwilym; pp. 199-206 (previously 1-8), transcripts of poems by, or attributed to, Gruff. ap Maredydd ap Dafydd; pp. 225-72, transcripts of, or extracts from, poems by, or attributed to, Dafydd ap Edmund, Llowdden, Siôn ap Dafydd ap . . ., Syr Lewys y defaid, Syr Lewys Anwyl, Robt. ab Ifan, Richd. Dafies, Esgob Dewi, Dafydd Nanmor, Tudur Aled, Wm. Cynwal, Siôn Brwynog, Harri ap Thomas ap Wiliam o'r ddiserth, ? Gruff. Hiraethog, Siôn Tudur, Syr Lewys Gethin, Lewis ab Edward, Dr. Morgan, Esgob Llanelwy, Alis ferch Gruff., Cadwgan ffol, Rhys Cain, Gutto'r Glynn, Iolo Goch, Llywelyn ab Gruffudd, Llywarch Hen, ?Siôn Dafydd Nanmor, Ieuan Gethin ab Ieuan ab Lleison, Hugh bach ab Hywel ab Shenkin, William Llyn, Edd. Llwyd, 'ceidwad y Museum yn Rhydychen', Gwalchmai, Lewis Powel, William Midelton, Bleddyn Fardd, Meil. ab Gwalch., and Pryd. Moch, and a transcript of a prose item ['Araith y gwr moel o Sythia']; and pp. 281-92, transcripts of poems [from the 'Book of Taliesin']. P. 297 is inscribed 'Caniadydd Morganwg sef Casgl o Hen Garolau, Caniadau, a Chwndidau. Rhif 11', and is followed on pp. 301-36 by transcripts of fourteen 'cwndidau' by, or attributed to, Thomas ab Ieuan ab Rhys and one 'cwndid' by, or attributed to, Thomas ap Ieuan Madog. P. 341 is inscribed 'Cwndidau a Chaniadau Rhys Brydydd o Lyfr R. Bradford', and is followed on pp. 343-59 by transcripts of three poems (two 'cwndidau') by, or attributed to, the said poet. Intermingled with the poems are notes or anecdotes relating to the following poets and 'eisteddfodau' - pp. iv, 79, and 121, Gwilym Tew and 'eisteddfodau' at the monastery of Pen Rys in Glyn Rhondde and Caerfyrddin; vii, Lewis Glynn Cothi and Tudur Penllyn; 50, Einion Offeiriad; 60, Dafydd ap Edmwnd and an 'eisteddfod' at Caerfyrddin; 100 and 104-05, Lewys Morganwg and 'Eisteddfod y Penrhyn yn Arfon'; 109 and 235, Gutto'r Glynn; 114, Siôn Mowddwy; 235-6, Iolo Goch; 237, Llywarch Hen; 265, Tudur Aled; and 342, Meredydd Philip (alias Bedo Philip Bach), his brothers Thomas and William, and his nephew Hopcin Thomas Philip, William Dafydd, and Morgan Pywel. Pp. 115-18 contain transcripts of notes on the use of double rhyme ('cyfochri') in some Welsh strict poetic metres and on the vaticinatory element in Welsh verse. These notes are attributed to Siôn Bradford. Edward Williams ('Iolo Morganwg') has inserted comments on some of the poems in the volume.

'Iolo Morganwg'.

Barddoniaeth,

A composite volume containing transcripts, in the hand of Edward Williams ('Iolo Morganwg'), of miscellaneous Welsh poems, being mainly strict-metre verse and including pp. 11-37, poems by, or attributed to, Taliesin; 39-65, the 'Gododdin' of Aneurin; 67-163, poems by, or attributed to, Taliesin, Myrddin, Llywarch Hen, Gruffudd ap Maredydd ap Daf., Dafydd Benfras, Llewelyn Goch vap Meurig Hen, Madawg Dwygraig, Trahaearn Brydydd Mawr, Howel Ystoryn, Iolo Goch, Gronwy Ddu, Gwilym Ddu 'o Arfon', Thomas Llewelyn 'o rygoes', Morgan Powel 'o Lanhari', Llewelyn Siôn 'o Langewydd', Gronwy William, Syr Dafydd Llwyd Llewelyn, Ellis Ellis, D. ab Gwilym, Gruff. Gryg, D. ab Edmwnt, William Morris, William Elias, Hywel Dafydd ap Ieuan ap Rhys, Thomas Prys, Siôn Tudur, Gruff. ap Daf. ap Tudur, and Wm. Cynwal; 167-89, a collection of 'cywyddau' by, or attributed to, Dafydd ap Gwilim; and 189-241, poems by, or attributed to, Morgan ap Hugh Lewis, ? Rhys Goch 'o glyn-ceiriog', Bedo Aurddrem, Gr. ap In. ap Lln. Fychan, Syr Dafydd Owain, Madog Benfras, In. ap Gruff. Leiaf, Huw Arwystli, Lewis Menai, Syr Clement, Rhys Goch 'o'r yri', Lewis Glyn Cothi, Gruff. Llwyd ap Han, ?Gruff. Llwyd ab Dafydd ab Einion Lygliw, and Lewys Morganwg, and further poems by, or attributed to, Aneurin, Taliesin, Siôn Tudur, Iolo Goch, Gruffydd Grug, Dafydd ap Edmond, and Dafydd ap Gwilym. Pp. 165-6 contain a list of two hundred and forty-six 'cywyddau' attributed to D[afydd ap] G[wilym]. For poems in this volume attributed to Dafydd ap Gwilym but probably written by Edward Williams, and for couplets or sections of poems probably written by Edward Williams and inserted in, or added to, poems by Dafydd ap Gwilym see the relevant sections of IMCY.

'Iolo Morganwg'.

Barddoniaeth,

A composite volume in the hand of Edward Williams ('Iolo Morganwg') containing 'cywyddau', 'englynion', etc., by Edward Williams himself, and a further corpus of unattributed poems, mainly 'cywyddau' and 'englynion', which are also probably the work of the said Edward Williams. Also included are two 'englynion' and one further stanza attributed to Taliesin ab lorwerth or Taliesin ab Iolo Morganwg, and scriptural extracts.

'Iolo Morganwg'.

Barddoniaeth,

A composite volume containing transcripts by Edward Williams ('Iolo Morganwg') of Welsh poems, mainly strict-metre verse in the form of 'cywyddau', attributed to Syr Dafydd Owain, Huw Dafydd Llwyd, Ieuan ap Hywel Swrdwal, Llawdden, Dafydd Llwyd Matthew, Siôn Mowddwy, Rhobin Ddu 'o Fôn', Siôn Tudur, Syr Dafydd Llwyd Fach or Syr Dafydd Llwyd Ysgolhaig, Lewis Glyn Cothi, Huw Pennant, Rhosser Cyffin, Person Llanberis, Dafydd ap Dafydd Llwyd, Thomas Prys, Rhisierdyn, Gutto'r Glynn, Meredydd ap Rhys, Rhys Goch Glyndyfrdwy, Siôn Brwynog, Thomas Celli, Llywelyn Goch ap Meuryg Hen, Rhys Cain 'o Groes Oswallt', Rhisiart Philip, Rhys Llwyd ap Rhys ap Rhiccart, Hywel ap Syr Mathew, Gruff. Hiraethog, Edmund Prys, Arch[d]diacon Meirionydd, Gruffudd Hafren, Rowland Fychan 'o Gaer Gai', Ieuan Llwyd Sieffre, Ieuan Tew Brydydd, Owain ap Llywelyn Moel, Lewys Môn, Dafydd Pennant, Rhys Goch ap Dafydd sef Rhys Goch Eryri, Tudur Aled, Ieuan Brydydd Hir, Siôn Philip, Lewis ab Edward Bencerdd, Wiliam Cynwal, Ieuan Deulwyn, Gruffudd ap Gweflyn, Lewys Menai, Dafydd Llwyd 'o Fathafarn', Dafydd ap Hywel, Ieuan ap Gruffudd Leiaf, Huw Arwystli, Rhys ap Llywelyn ap Gruffudd ap Rhys, Guttyn Owain, Hywel Dafydd ap Ieuan ap Rhys, Iolo Goch, Ieuan Llawdden, Wiliam Llyn, Gruffudd Gryg, Dafydd Llwyd ab Einion Lyglyw (or Gruffydd Llwyd ab Dafydd ab Einion Lygliw, or Dafydd ab Gruffydd Llwyd ab Einion Lygliw), Dafydd ab Gwilym, Lewys Morganwg (or Lewys Brydydd Hodnant), Rhisiart ap Rhys Llwyd, Iorwerth Fynglwyd, Thomas Derllysg, Dafydd, Abad diweddaf Margam, Siôn y Cent, Thomas Lleison 'o Gastell Nedd', Ieuan Du'r Bilwg, Llywelyn Moel y Pantri, Rhys Llwyd ab Rhys ab Rhisiart 'o Lan Haran', Ieuan Rudd, Gruffudd ap Ieuan ap Llywelyn Fychan 'o Lannerch Llyweni', Meredydd ap Rhosser, Tudur Penllyn, Dafydd ap Edmwnd, Ieuan Brechfa, Syr Owain ap Gwilym, Bedo Hafes, Syr Rhys o Garno, Dafydd Llwyd ab Llewelyn ab Gruffydd, Llywelyn ab Guttyn, Trahaiarn Brydydd Mawr, ? Iorwerth Beli, Llywelyn Goch y Dant, Wiliam Pywel 'o Gastell Madog', Dafydd y Coed, Ieuan Môn Hen, Gruffudd ab Gronw Gethin, Meyrig Dafydd, Wiliam Byrcinsha, Syr Dafydd Trefor, Bleddyn Siôn 'o Lancarfan', Casnodyn, Syr Rhys Offeiriad, Llywelyn ap Guttyn, Ieuan Gethin ab Ieuan ab Lleison, Syr Dafydd Jones, Ficcer Llanfair Dyffryn Clwyd, Ifan Llwyd, and Siôn ap Ffelpot. There are occasional notes on the poems and poets and on the source of the transcript.

'Iolo Morganwg'.

Barddoniaeth,

A composite volume containing transcripts of Welsh free- and strict-metre poems in the hand of Edward Williams ('Iolo Morganwg'). Pp. 23-398 contain Welsh strict-metre poems, mainly in the form of 'cywyddau', attributed to Syr Gruffudd Fychan, Lang. Lewys, Siôn Dafydd Las . . . 'o Lanuwchlyn', Gwilym ap Ieuan Hen, Siôn Cent, Simwnt Fychan, Siôn Philip, Dafydd ap Gwilym, Llawdden, Dafydd Llwyd ap Llywelyn ap Gruffudd, Huw Machno, Iolo Goch, Gruffudd Dafydd ap Hywel, Edward ab Raf ab Robert, ? Dafydd o'r Nant sef Dafydd Wiliams, offeiriad Llanfrynach ym Morganwg, ? Dafydd Nanmor, Edmund Prys, Syr Siôn Leiaf, Tudur Penllyn, Wiliam Llyn, Madog Benfras, Llywelyn ap Meredyth ap Ednyfed sef Lle'n Llogell 'o Farchwiail', Rhys ap Dafydd Llwyd ap Llywelyn Llygliw, Rhys Goch 'o Eryri', Ieuan Gethin ab Ieuan ab Lleision, Thomas ab Ieuan ab Rhys, Casnodyn Fardd, Gutto'r Glynn, Iorwerth Fynglwyd, Wiliam Egwad, ?Rhys Brydydd 'o Dir Iarll', ?Rhys Du Brydydd, Ieuan Tew Ieuanc, Syr Thomas Jones 'o Lan Deilo Bertholeu', Lewys Morganwg, Tomas Lewys . . . 'o Lechau ym Mhlwyf Llanhari', Thomas Llywelyn 'o Regoes', ? Syr Dafydd Llwyd Llywelyn, Sippyn Cyfeiliawg, Hywel Llwyd, Lewys Glynn Cothi, Ieuan ap Hywel Swrdwal, Gruffudd Vychan ap Gruffudd ap Ednyfed, Siôn ap Howel ap Llywelyn Fychan, Lewys Môn, Richard Philip, Siôn Dafies, person Garthbeibio, sef y Dr. Dafies o Fallwyd, Rhys Llwyd ab Rhys ab Rhiccert, Llywelyn Moel y Pantry, Dafydd Benwyn, Gruffudd Llwyd ap Gronw Gethin, Owain ap Siôn ap Rhys, Huw Cae Llwyd, Grufludd Hiraethog, Cadwaladr ap Rhys Trefnant, Siôn ap Hywel Llywelyn Fychan, Deio ap Ieuan Du, Rhys Nanmor, Ieuan Tew Hynaf, Rowland Fychan 'o Gaergai', ? Rhisiart Iorwerth, Rhys Cain, Rhys Meigen, Thomas Carn, ? Hywel Dafydd ap Ieuan ap Rhys, and Thomas Lewys 'o Lechau Llannwonno'. There are occasional annotations by [Edward Williams] 'Iolo Morganwg' and the 'cywydd' attributed to Casnodyn Fardd (pp. 127-32) is followed (pp. 133-4) by notes mentioning a Glamorgan tradition which linked the name of that poet with the origin of the 'cywydd' measure. Pp. 236-8 contain a first-line index to the poems on pp. 239-360. Pp. 399-546 are devoted to poems attributed to Siencin Lygad Rhawlin, Dafydd o'r Nant, Hopcin y Gweydd 'o Fargam', Thomas Llywelyn 'o Regoes', Syr Tomas Jones, ofleiriad Llandeilo Bertholeu, Syr Huw Dafydd 'o Gelli Gaer', Rhys Goch o Dir Iarll ab Rhiccert ab Einion ab Collwyn (twenty poems), Hopcin Twm Philip 'o'r Gelli Fid', Syr Siôn ap Morys, Siôn Lewys Richard 'o blwyf Llangrallo', ? Ifan Huw 'o Ystrad Owain', Dafydd Nicolas 'o Aberpergwm', ? Huw Llwyd 'o Lancarfan', ? Twm ab Ifan ab Rhys, Hywel Llwyd 'o Lancarfan', Wil Tabwr, Gronw Wiliam, Morgan Pywel, Gwilym Tew, Thomas Morgan 'o'r Tyle Garw', Edward ab Efan 'o Benn y Fai', Llywelyn ab Hywel ab Ieuan ap Gronw 'o Lantrisaint' alias Llelo Llantrisaint, Thomas Llywelyn, ficar Llancarvan, Edward Matthews . . . 'o blwyf Llangrallo', and Sioni'r Maeswn Dimmai. There are occasional notes by [Edward Williams] 'Iolo Morganwg' and p. 419 contains a list of the titles of the twenty poems attributed to Rhys Goch ab Rhiccert (pp. 421-54 ). A square slip of brown paper inscribed 'Hen Garolau a gasglwyd yng Ngwynedd' has been pasted on to p. 547 and this is followed on pp. 551-610 by a series of thirty numbered 'carolau' the majority unattributed and some attributed to Huw Dafydd, Thomas Evans, Syr Lewys ab Huw, Llywelyn ab Hywel ab Ieuan ab Gronw, Llywelyn ab Hwlcyn 'o Fôn', Dicc Hughes, R. Hughes, and Richard Hughes (? whether the last three named were the same person). Pp. 611-33 contain three poems two of which are attributed to Huw ap Wiliam ap Dd. ap Gronw and Siôn Morys.

'Iolo Morganwg'.

Barddoniaeth, etc.,

A composite volume in the hand of Edward Williams ('Iolo Morganwg') the contents consisting almost entirely of Welsh free- and strict-metre verse, the latter being mainly in the form of 'englynion'. Most of the verse items, whether single stanzas, multi-stanza poems, or sequences of stanzas, bear the name of the said [Edward Williams] 'Iolo Morganwg', and all are probably his work. Many are in an incomplete form. Pp. 1-16 contain a copy of a proposed preface or foreword to a collection of poems which [Edward Williams] 'Iolo Morganwg' apparently intended to publish in 1809 (see IM, tt. xliv-xlv), and this is followed on pp. 17-88 by verse items including items with the titles or superscriptions 'Gwasgaredd Iolo Morganwg', 'Anneddfoldeb', 'Dyn ymguddgar', 'Cwyn Clwyfus', 'Dyriau Gwasgar', 'Pennillion diarhebol Iolo Morganwg', 'Pennillion serch gwasgar', 'Darnau Defnyddion Doethineb Teuluaidd', 'Cynghor', 'Tribanau', 'Pennillion 1805', 'Doethineb Teuluaidd sef Pennillion Diarhebawl', 'Salm 105', 'Canu Gwashaela Sir Gaer', 'Emyn Dydd Barn', 'Emyn Angladd', 'Salm 104', and 'Salm'. The upper half of p. 89 bears the inscription 'Doethineb Teuluaidd Neu Lawrol Doethineb sef Egwyddorion Dyled at Dduw a Dyn ar Fesurau cân rhwyddion ac mewn Iaith esmwyth hawdd ei dealt Er addysg i'r Ieuainc a'r Annysgedig. Iolo Morganwg ai cant' which is followed on the lower half of the page by three stanzas of verse and on pp. 91-2 by nine stanzas of an incomplete poem. On p. 95, which was possibly a 'title-page' for the section now paginated 99-138, is a variant version of the aforementioned inscription reading 'Doethineb Teuluaidd ar Fesurau cerdd rhwyddion ac mewn Iaith esmwyth Er hawsder dealt i'r annysgedig a'r Ieuanc. Iolo Morganwg ai cant', two stanzas of Welsh verse by 'Iolo Morganwg', a Latin quotation from the works of Seneca, and the date 'Alban Eilir 1807'. This is followed on pp. 99-131 by poems with the superscriptions 'Doethineb Teuluaidd. Trioedd Doethineb', 'Gwersi Doethineb sef Gwasgaredd Doethineb. Y Cwlm Cyntaf', and 'Gwasgaredd Doethineb. Yr ail gwlm', and thirty-nine stanzas without a superscription. Pp. 139-40 contain miscellaneous stanzas headed 'Gwasgaredd Iolo Morganwg' and pp. 143-4 a sequence of stanzas headed 'Cynghorion gwasgaredig o'r ysgrythurau'. P. 147 is inscribed 'Doethineb Teuluaidd Sef Caniadau Dwyfawl a Moesawl ar Fesurau esmwythion Er addysg Dwyfol a moesol I blant a Chymreigyddion Ieuainc Gan Iolo Morganwg, B.B.D.', and p. 148 contains a list of the names of, or descriptions of, eighteen poems or sequences of verse or groups of poems to be found on pp. 149-202 including 'Cân y diodydd ar hen ddiarhebion Cymreig', 'Cân y Ffermwr', 'Englynion i Ddosparth Cerdd dafawd Gwynedd' (called 'Englynion sen . . .' on p. 148), 'Ar ddiwydrwydd', stanzas without a title or superscription but listed as 'Pennillion y Trallodion' on p. 148, 'Englynion y Bedydd', 'Englynion o flaen Trioedd Pawl', 'Gwasgargerdd Iolo Morganwg', 'Salm', miscellaneous stanzas including 'englynion' and 'tribannau', 'Gwasgaredd Iolo Morganwg', 'Tribanau' (listed as 'Tribanau Gwasgargerdd' on p. 148), miscellaneous 'englynion' including two relating to 'awdlau' submitted at an 'eisteddfod' held at Aberhonddi in 1822, 'I Owain Myfyr' (a bitter attack on Owen Jones ('Owain Myfyr')), 'Englynion i'r Greal a gyhoeddwyd gan Ddeudneudwyr Llundain', 'Pennillion Iolo Morganwg' (one hundred stanzas containing moral precepts), a sequence of twenty-one stanzas of a similar nature (these two series of one hundred and twenty-one stanzas are probably the ones referred to as 'Doethineb Teuluaidd (Ex Catonis Disticha de Moribus)' in the list on p. 148, see IM, t. 290), and 'Cynghor'. (continued)

The remainder of the volume contains further verse items including items with the superscriptions 'Gwybodau - Celfyddyd', 'Trioedd Iolo Morganwg', 'Gwasgaredd Doethineb, yr ail Gwlm', 'Pennillion, Englynion, Dernynau Iolo Morganwg', 'Englynion mawl i Dduw am waredigaeth o dwyll y Byd', 'Englyn i chwaldodwr disynwyr', 'Cynghog', 'Englynion y Wawr', 'Englynion Pwnc Eisteddfod Aber Cwm y Fywch, 1771', 'Englyn i Gybydd', 'Englynion i Gymdeithas o Rithgrefyddwyr mewn Ile nid rhaid ei enwi ym Morganwg', 'Englyn i For gerwin temhestlog', 'Pennill i Rithgrefyddwyr Aberthin', 'Pennillion Iolo Morganwg', 'Dechreuad Bonedd', 'Englyn i Dai Gwynnion Morganwg', 'Englynion ar dorriad allan y Rhyfel yn 1802', 'Englynion diweddglo'r salmau ac eraill amrafaelion', 'Beirdd', 'Cân Lewys Gabriel', 'Hymn i Sior y Crinwas' (this poem attributed to Bleddyn bach ap y Gwir), 'Englynion ar Undod Duw', 'Pennill a gant y Bardd iddo'i hunan', 'Cynghor hen gybydd ar ei wely angau iddei Fab o Ladin Horad', 'Beddwers Sior y Crinwas', 'Englyn i Hen ferch afrywiog dros ben', 'Englynion i'r Fronfraith', 'Trioedd yr offeiriad a gant Iolo Morganwg yng Ngorsedd yr Alban Hefin ar ben y Garth ym Morganwg, 1797', 'Englyn a feddyliwyd ei roddi ar faner Rhyddfilwyr Morganwg', 'Can a wnaed yn y flwyddyn 1777 y Bardd yn dychwelyd i Forganwg wedi bod flynyddau lawer yn Lloegr', 'Beddbennill', 'Englynion y Gwynt, 1770', 'Breiniau Dyn' (two versions), 'Hymn undodaidd', and 'Casgliadau o'r Gwasgaredd at y Doethineb Teu[lu]aidd' besides items without titles or superscriptions. There is an English stanza entitled 'Epitaph on the Sexton of Cowbridge' on p. 230. The few prose items in the section from p. 203 onwards include a brief note relating to a specific type of poetic exercise at 'eisteddfodau' in Morgannwg (pp. 223-5), a brief note in connection with a psalm composed on the occasion of opening a Berean meeting house (Ty Cwrdd Berea) (p. 229), and a list headed 'Llyma'r achos y rhoes Duw ei fendith i Ddyn' (p. 283). P. 237 contains what appears to be a copy of a proposed title-page to a collection of poems containing moral precepts entitled 'Llawrol Doethineb Neu Doethineb Teuluaidd' composed by [Edward Williams] 'Iolo Morganwg' possibly with a view to publication in 1816.

'Iolo Morganwg'.

Barddoniaeth, etc.,

Miscellaneous papers and home-made booklets containing transcripts, lists, notes, memoranda, etc., in the hand of Edward Williams ('Iolo Morganwg') bound together in one volume. Pp. 1-64 contain transcripts of Welsh strict-metre poems attributed to Dafydd Benwyn, Siôn Ieuan ap Rhys Fychan, Llywelyn ap Hywel ap Ieuan ap Gronw 'o Lantrisant Misgyn', Iorwerth Hen, Dafydd Llwyd Mathau, Ieuan Du'r Bilwg, Owain ap Llywelyn ap y Moel y Pantri, Dafydd Hopcin 'o Blwyf y Coetty', Siôn Bradford, Rhys Morgan 'o Ben Craig Nedd', Gutto'r Glynn, Bedo Brwynllys, Syr Rhisiart Lewys, Siôn ap Hywel Gwynn, Rhisiart Iorwerth, Rhys Goch 'o Eryri', Ieuan Dyfi, Hopcin ap Thomas ab Einion, Dafydd ap Gwilym, and Hywel ap Dafydd ap Ieuan ap Rhys, with occasional notes on the poet and / or the poem attributed to Siôn Bradford. Preceding p. 1 are two, brown- paper leaves one of which is inscribed 'Englynion, Awdlau, a Chywyddau o Lyfr Ieuan Bradford a'i synniadau ef arnynt'. Other Welsh verse items transcribed include sequences of 'Englynion y misoedd' attributed to Merfyn Gwawdrydd and Madawg ab Merfyn Gwawdrydd (77- 85, 95-8), 'englynion' attributed to Gruff. ab Daf. ab Tudur (93), Rhisiart Iorwerth (93), Dafydd Nicolas, Aberpergwm (99), Cadwgan ap Rhys ( 99), Thos. Lln. Regoes (99), Llawdden (100), Ieuan Brydydd Hir (101), Siôn ap Dafydd (207), [Edward Williams] 'Iolo Morganwg' (216, 257), John Jones ' o Fôn' (218), D. Edmwnd (282), Tudur Aled (359), Edmwnd Prys (438), Gruff. Philip (438), and D[afydd ap] G[wilym] (470), a 'cywydd' attributed to Robert Huws 'o Fôn' (101-03), three poems entitled 'Buarth Beirdd', 'Canu y byd mawr', and 'Canu y byd bychan' [from the 'Book of Taliesin'] (105-10), a sequence of 'Englynion y coedydd a gant y Beirdd yn eu Cadair gân yn Llangynwyd', the 'englynion' being attributed to Edward Dafydd, Dafydd Edward, Charles Meredydd, Siams Thomas, Hywel Rhys, Dafydd Rhys, William Lidwn, Hopcin Thomas, Siôn Padam, Mathew Llwyd 'o Gelli Gaer', Llywelyn Thomas, and Harri Lleision 'o Lancarfan' (121-3), an 'awdl' and a sequence of eleven 'englynion' attributed to Edward Evans (125-30), extracts from the works of the Cynfeirdd as published in The Myvyrian Archaiology of Wales, vol. I, here transcribed under the superscription 'Assonances of the school of Taliesin or of the 6th century' (149-63), ten stanzas with the title 'Cân i'r llaw' attributed to Siôn Wiliams 'o Landathan' (181-4), further extracts from the works of the Cynfeirdd as published in The Myvyrian Archaiology, vol. I, under the superscription 'Cynghanedd unawdl. Consonance of rhime the only consonance that was systematically required by the Bards of the ancient school' (202-04), four stanzas with the title 'Darnau o Gân y Mab o'r Dolau Gleision' (209), further extracts from the works of the Cynfeirdd as published in The Myvyrian Archaiology (210-12), extracts from 'Y Gododdin' (374-85), and three stanzas attributed to Mabclaf ap Llywarch (489). (continued)

Prose items include a note on a 'vellum, very ancient' manuscript of the 'Laws of Dyfnwal Moelmud and other ancient Laws antecedent to those of Hywel Dda' allegedly to be found amongst the Hengwrt MSS in the late seventeenth century (93-4), triads (133-4, 136, 279), an account of 'wear and tear expences, daily expences on my [? Edward Williams's] Tour thro' South Wales in 1802' (167), a list of 'Names of Places in N[orth] W[ales]' (168-9), notes on Gruffydd ap Cynan's connection with the Welsh bardic laws (177-80), a brief note on Welsh vernacular dialects (180), a brief genealogy of Syr Rhys ap Thomas (187), a brief account of 'schools' of Welsh poetry, viz. the Ancient or Primitive school, the schools of Taliesin, Gruffydd ap Cynan, Tir Iarll or Rhys goch ap Rhiccert, and Llawdden, the Northwalian school, the schools of Nature, Gronwy Owain, Glamorgan, and the Gwyneddigion, the modern Southwalian school, and the school of the Jumpers including 'William Williams, the hymn carpenter' (258-9, 188-91, 196-9, leaves misplaced), two lists headed 'Naw Cyhydedd' and 'Corvannau' (201), a brief note on 'cynghanedd lusc', assonant terminations, and initial and complex alliterations (205), a brief pedigree of George Owain (206), a list with the superscription 'Letters and Essays of Iolo Morganwg' (219, 235), lists of caps and wigs which would be sold 'at the Annual Fair' on All Fool's Day (222-3), a list of 'Gwyr Cwm y Felin' (224; see NLW MS 13121B above ), two medicinal recipes for the cure of cancer (227-8), a statistical table showing average rainfall in various parts of the British Isles (228), a similar table showing the population of various South Wales towns [? circa 1800, see IM, t. 5] (230), a ? introductory note to an intended collection of Welsh proverbs and aphorisms (231), extracts from The Crit[ical] Review, June 1803 (233-4), lists of rare plants, various kinds of stone, clay, etc., castles, abbeys and monasteries, ancient houses in the Gothic style, other ruins, [gentlemen's] seats, British and Roman camps, and Druidical monuments, ? all in Glamorgan (240-52), a list of Glamorgan exports (253), a list of 'Fish in Ogmore River' (255-6), a brief pedigree of Oliver Cromwell (280), a list of Welsh families who derived their surnames from their place of residence (393-4), a list of North Wales poets whose names were derived from place-names and a list of South Wales poets (395-6), notes headed 'Peculiarities of the North Walian dialect' (405-09), a list of 'Barbarous names of places in Anglesea' (413), ? extracts from 'Adam Littleton's Latin Geographical and Historical Dictionary, Anno 1678' (429-31), a note on Llanfachreth church [co. Merioneth] (438), a list of the commissioners at the 'eisteddfod' held at Caerwys [co. Flint], 9 Elizabeth I, and of some of the bards licensed at the said 'eisteddfod' (453), two lots of notes on agriculture headed 'Ffermyddiaeth hen' and 'Hen ffermyddiaeth' (455-7), and biographical or genealogical notes or data (sometimes very brief) relating to Llywelyn Brenn, Ifor ap Einon, Llywelyn Bren Hen and Llywelyn Bren Ieuanc (165), Rhys Pritchard (176), Walter Lollard, Dafydd Ddu Hiraddug, John Stow, [John] Gower, and [Geoffrey] Chaucer (193), John de Ecclescliff, Lleibiaw, Ceraint Hir, Nicholas ap Gwrgant, and John Pascall, all bishops of Llandaff (192 + 200), Ifor Hael (200 + 235), Thos. Wilkins, rector of Lanmaes, ob. 1699 (200), Edward Davies, rector of St. Brides, ob. 1672 ( 201), members of the Berkrolls family (217), Gwynfardd Dyfed (235), and Wm. Llyn (487). Also included in the volume are lists or groups of Welsh words (sometimes with English definitions), extracts of varying length from the works of Welsh bards and poets (sometimes to provide examples of specific words, phrases, or names, e.g. Hu Gadarn), and notes or memoranda on a variety of subjects.

'Iolo Morganwg'.

Barddoniaeth, trioedd, etc.,

Miscellaneous papers containing notes, transcripts, extracts, copies of his own poems, etc., by Edward Williams ('Iolo Morganwg') bound together in one volume and paginated 1-390. The contents include notes on the perpetual calendar carved on wood known as 'The Staffordshire Clogg' (p. 13); notes on the special alphabet usually inscribed on wooden surfaces which, according to Edward Williams, was used by Welsh bards (pp. 15-25); notes on the method of inscribing the said bardic alphabet headed 'Llyma ddangos y modd y gwneir Coelbren y Beirdd' (p. 29; see John Williams: Barddas . . ., vol. I, pp. 142-51); notes, often in the form of questions and answers, on Welsh bardic lore relating to the origin of letters ('Pa fodd y cafad Gwybodaeth gyntaf ar lythyr' (p. 36), 'Pwy a wnaeth Lythyr gyntaf' (p. 41), 'Pwy gyntaf a gafas ddeall ar lythyr' (p. 91)), the origin of life ('O beth y Gwnaeth Duw'r byd a bywydolion' (pp. 77-8)), etc. (for much of this material see various sections of John Williams: Barddas, vol. I); notes on matters of bardic significance under headings such as 'Trioedd y Ford Gronn sef Trioedd Cadair Tir Iarll Er dangos a Gyrru addysg ar y Gwybodau a'r gelfyddyd a'r drefn a ddylid ar gadair a gorsedd ac ar Gerdd Dafawd . . .' (p. 72), 'Llyma Dderwyddoniaeth Beirdd Ynys Prydain a'i Barn am Dduw a phob bywydolion . . .' (pp. 85-9; see Barddas, vol. I, pp. 204-13), 'Llyma Rol Cof a Chyfrif' (pp. 212-14; see Iolo Manuscripts . . ., pp. 45-9, 424-9), and 'Teuluwr-Datgeiniad' (p. 244 ); notes on Welsh poetic metres, etc., headed 'Cerdd Deulu' (p.42), 'Llawrol y Beirdd Meyryg Dafydd' (pp. 51-2), 'Cylmau sef Caeau Cerdd Dafawd' (p. 180), and 'Pedwar Mesur ar hugain Dosparth Caerfyrddin' (p. 355); lists, many incomplete, of miscellaneous Welsh triads including lists with the headings 'Llyma Drioedd y Beirdd' (p. 78), 'Trioedd Ynys Prydain o Lyfr Iaco ab Dewi gan Rys Thomas' (pp. 157-63), 'Trioedd Cymmysg, 1798' (pp. 169-70), 'Trioedd o Lyfr Menw Hen' (p. 171), 'Trioedd Bonedd' (p. 172 ), 'Trioedd Addwynder' (pp. 173-5), 'Trioedd Gruffydd ab Cynan' (pp.183-? 90) 'Trioedd Dosparth y Ford Gronn' (p. 221), 'Trioedd amravaelion' (pp. 223-4), 'Trioedd Cerdd' (pp. 232-3, 267-8, 273), 'Trioedd Ach a Bonedd' (p. 234), 'Trioedd y Beirdd (Octr. 1797)' (pp. 241-2), 'Eraill o drioedd y Teuluwr' (pp. 245-6), 'Llyma drioedd Cerdd o Lyfr Celli Wion' (pp. 246-7), 'Llyma Hen drioedd Cyfarwyddyd . . .' (p. 249), 'Trioedd Cymmysg' (pp. 249- 50, 271-2), 'Trioedd Derwyddoniaeth' (p. 254), 'Trioedd y Beirdd' (pp. 258 + 252), 'Trioedd Barddas a Defodau' (pp. 260-62; see Barddas, vol. I, pp. 344-57), 'Trioedd Bonedd' (pp. 263-5, ? 262), 'Llyma Drioedd Llelo Llawdrwm . . .' (pp. 270-71), 'Llyma Drioedd o amrafaelion lyfrau . . .' ( pp. 273-4), and '. . . Rhai o drioedd ynys prydain a gymerwyd allan o lyfr Mr. Fychan yn Llyfrgell Hengwrt gan Lewis Morris, Esqr., 1738' (pp. 279-80 ); English translations of two of the aforementioned lists of triads under the headings 'The Bardic Triades' (pp. 251 + 253), and 'Druidic Triades' (p. 255); a copy of an 'awdl' attributed to Dafydd y Coed (p. 56); notes on Sir Gruffydd Llwyd, son of Rhys ap Gruffydd, and the late thirteenth century Welsh poet Trahaearn (p. 57); a copy of an epitaph attributed to Edw[ar]d Rich[ar]ds, Ystrad Meurig (p. 118); music and words under the heading 'Cyngog yr Iuddewonn' (p. 123); notes headed 'Collections for a Silurian Grammar' (pp. 129-30); notes ? on a proposal to publish a multi-volume work or works on matters of Welsh bardic, literary, linguistic, historical, and antiquarian interest (pp. 229-30, 236); notes on various forms of the proper name Einigan (pp. 238-9); a list of the names of ancient Welsh bards (p. 248); a version of the Welsh prose text 'Breuddwyd Gronwy Ddu' (pp. 275-6); a list of the traditional thirteen royal treasures of the Isle of Britain ('Llyma drithlws ar ddeg o frenin dlysau ynys prydain . . .') (p.276); draft proposals for publishing Cyfrinach Beirdd Ynys Prydain (p. 281); and a letter from [Edward Williams ] 'Iorwerth Morganwg' from Tredelerch, to John Edwards at Mr. Owen Jones, London, 1784 (personal, a ? proposed publication by 'Sieffrai o Walsal', Mr. [William] Warrington's proposed 'History of Wales', the writer's interest in the old realm of Glamorgan, changes in the names and boundaries of the medieval divisions of Wales, mention of [Owen Jones, 'Owain] Myfyr' and the Cymmrodorion and Gwyneddigion Societies, a request for a copy of 'awdl Aneurin ar amrafael rhannau Cymru') (pp. 343-6). The contents of pp. 289-342 and 347-82 consist almost entirely of transcripts of Welsh strict-metre poems in the form of 'cywyddau' and 'englynion'. Many of these bear one of the various bardic names adopted by Edward Williams at various times ('Iorwerth Morganwg', 'Iorwerth Gwilym neu brydydd bychan Morganwg', 'Iolo Morganwg') and all may possibly be his compositions.

'Iolo Morganwg'.

Bardism; miscellanea,

A volume (pp. i-xxii; 1-449) containing miscellaneous items, many relating to Welsh bardism, in the hand of Edward Williams ('Iolo Morganwg'). The contents include pp. 1-3, a note re the proclamation in 1795 of a bardic meeting to be held at Pen Bryn Owain in co. Glamorgan in 1796; 3-7, notes re the times of holding bardic meetings ('Cadair a Gorsedd wrth Gerdd a Barddoniaeth'), etc.; 7-16, eleven rules under the superscription 'Darbodau Gorsedd Gyfallwy Cadair Morganwg . . . ar Benn Brynn Owain ym Morganwg . . . 1795' relating to the conduct of bardic meetings, the measures, content, and language of poems, the bards, etc.; 25-8, a note of a proclamation in 1798 of a 'Cadair a Gorsedd ar Gerdd a Barddoniaeth' to be held at Pen Brynn Owain in co. Glamorgan in twelve months time, notes on the times of holding future bardic meetings '. . . ymmraint Cadair Orsedd Morganwg . . . ar ben Twyn Owain', and a geographical definition of the term Morgannwg in this context; 35-44., notes headed 'Coelbren y Beirdd herwydd Llyfr Llywelyn Siôn' being notes relating to the special alphabet reputedly devised by the Welsh bards for carving or notching on wooden surfaces and different modes of constructing wooden appliances or so-called 'books' which could be used as writing surfaces when utilising this alphabet; 51, an incomplete version of a 'question and answer' conversation between a teacher and his disciple; 55-6, notes relating to early British bards called 'gwyddoniaid', a bardic meeting between Prydain ab Aedd Mawr and three of these bards called Plennydd, Alawn, and Gwron ('Tri Phrif Feirdd Ynys Prydain'), rules for the bardic order formulated then, etc.; 57-60, English definitions of, or notes in Welsh on, terms of bardic relevance, e.g. 'Alban', 'Gorsedd Arddangos', 'Arwest', 'Cerdd Arwest'; 63-73, extracts of varying length from the works of Welsh poets ? illustrating bardic or poetic terms ('Bardic Allusions from the Welsh Bards'); 79, a note on 'Colofn Prydain (sef felly y gelwir y Gyhydedd Gyrch yn Llyfr Gm. Tew)'; 80-82, notes on Welsh literary production up to and including the fifteenth century mentioning Dafydd ap Gwilym, Llawdden, Harri ap Rhys ap Gwilym, Ieuan Brechfa, Edeyrn dafawd aur, Einiawn offeiriad, Dafydd Ddu Hiraddug, and Hopkin ap Thomas; 82-6, notes relating to an 'eisteddfod' held under the patronage of Gruffydd ap Rhys ap Tewdwr in Aberteifi and to rules concerning the order of bards and musicians formulated there; 87-8, brief notes on the bardic 'cadair arddangos' and 'cadair dwmpath'; 89, a note relating to the original of Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet, an extract from the said work, and a note on 'a circumstance . . . exactly similar' in a poem by Dafydd ap Gwilym; 90-91, notes on Dafydd ap Gwilym and his poetry; 92-4, notes on the Welsh alphabet; 95-? 104, the rules and customs of the bardic chair of Tir Iarll ('Trefnau a Defodau Cadair Tir Iarll'); 111-13, bardic miscellanea; 119- 22, notes relating to the rights, etc., of the bardic order with the superscription 'Llyma ddangos amrafaelion o arferion a breiniau a defodau a barnau a chyfarwyddyd a berthynent i Feirdd a gwyr wrth gerdd o'r hen Lyfrau'; 127-33, notes on 'Cerdd Gadair', 'Cerdd Deuluaidd', 'Clergerdd', 'Datgeiniad Cadair', and 'Datgeiniad Penpastwn'; (continued)

135-7 + 145, further notes re rules for bardic meetings; 142, two triads; 143-4 + 155, notes relating to ? the Welsh bardic alphabet; 154, a note on 'Tair colofn Barddoniaeth'; 157-9, notes relating to the alleged association between (a) Gruffudd ap Cynan and Bleddyn ap Cynfyn and the code of rules for the bardic order, (b) Bleddyn ap Cynfyn and 'regulations for genealogies and armorial bearings', (c) Rhys ap Tewdwr and the introduction of the 'Bardic Laws of the Round Table' from Armorica, and (d) Gruffudd ap Cynan and 'a musical sessions in Glyn Achlach in Ireland . . . 1096'; 171-4, a transcript of twelve stanzas of Welsh verse attributed to Siencyn o'r Crwys y Prydydd; 174, a list of 'Plant Caw o Brydyn'; 175, a transcript of a twelve-line Welsh stanza allegedly composed by Thomas Glyn Cothi on the occasion of the French landing at Fishguard in 1797; 176-7, genealogical data relating to the family of Iestyn ab Gwrgan and related families; 178, a transcript of an 'englyn' relating to Owain Glyn Dyfrdwy attributed to Ieuan Gethin ap Ieuan ap Lleision; 179, a few entries relating to events in Welsh history, 870-959; 180, a transcript of 'englynion' ? attributed to Hywel Ystoryn; 181-6, an anecdote and notes relating to ? the reputed poetesses of Ty Talwyn, parish of Llangynwyd [co. Glamorgan]; 187 + 193, skeleton notes on Llanilid, Llanharan, Llanhari, Llantrisaint, St. Donats, and Flimston [co. Glamorgan]; 188-9, historical and other notes relating to the parish of Merthyr Tydvil [co. Glamorgan]; 190, a list of 'Antiquities in and about Merthyr'; 191, a note on Mallt Walbi 'a Brecon virago' and leader of a gang of freebooters, and a list of 'Remarkable Parishes' [in Glamorgan]; 192, a list of 'Antiquities in and about Lantwit Major' [co. Glamorgan]; 205, extracts relating to 'Melchin, an ancient British author', 'Hu Gadarn', etc., 'Ex Celtic Remains by Lewis Morris'; 206-07, a note on heroic poetry and the attitude of the 'descendants of the Celts' towards it; 219- 22, comments on orthography arising out of [William] Owen [Pughe]'s innovations with regard to Welsh orthography; 223-7, notes relating to the formation of compounds and plurals of monosyllabic words in ancient Cimbric and modern Welsh; 227-39, notes relating to the original home of the Cymry and early druidism and bardism, etc.; 241, a short list of Welsh words relating to worship with English definitions; 242-4, notes on the principles of druidism; 246-51, notes relating to the 'Great Eisteddfod at Caermarthen' [? 1451], 'the system of versification that received the sanction of that Eisteddfod', the adoption of this system by the bards of North Wales and some of those of South Wales, its rejection by the bards of Glamorgan and their compilation of 'a system of discipline, of Poetical Criticism, of Versification, and of whatever appertained to their science', the death of the Carmarthen system during the reign of James I, Gronwy Owen's verse, and the Gwyneddigion Society's annual Welsh poetry competition and its attempt 'to restore the system of the Carmarthen Eisteddfod'; 252-4, notes relating to an 'eisteddfod' held at Nant Gonwy, 1 Edward IV, incorporating 'englynion' attributed to Dafydd ap Edmund and Twm Tegid Brydydd 'o Langower ym Mhenllyn'; 259-66 + 274-82, an outline journal of a journey from South to North Wales and back, July-August 1800, the places mentioned on the northward journey including Cowbridge, Bridgend, Neath, Caeo, Dolau Cothi, Pumsaint, Clydogau Mountain, Llanfair Cludogeu, Llandewi Brevi, Tregaron, Pont Rhyd Fendigaid, Hafod, Pont ar fynach, Llanbadarn, Aberdyfi, Towyn, Dolgelleu, and Blaeneu (a visit to [Rhys Jones, antiquary and poet] and transcribing of manuscripts), and on the return journey Llanfachreth, Dolgelley (mention here of harpists and of the origin of the triple-stringed harp), Carneddi Hengwm, Tal y llynn, Abergyrnolwyn, Aberdyfi, Aberystwyth, Llanrhystid, Tal y sarn, New Inn, Abergwily, Caerm[arthe]n, Llangyndeyrn, Pont y Berem, Llan Nonn, Cydwely, Llanelly, Pont ar Ddulais, Swansea, Llangynwyd, and Bridgend; 262, a transcript of twelve lines of English verse entitled 'Loyalty by a Cobler'; 264, a transcript of an 'englyn' attributed to Huw Llwyd Cynfel; 270-73, a Welsh saints' calendar; 306, a plan of a 'Sheepfold at the foot of Cadair Idris, another in ruins on the same plan Cefn Merthyr, several more in Glamorgan'; (continued)

307, a transcript of the 'title-page' of Edward Jones: The Bardic Museum of Primitive British Literature . . .; 308-13, a series of eleven Welsh triads ('Llyma Drioedd y Beirdd') with an English translation thereof extracted from pp. 1-4 of the aforementioned Bardic Museum by Edward Jones; 316, a medicinal recipe for rheumatism in the head; 317, a 'Plan of a school house or accademy'; 323-38, extracts from Sharon Turner: History . . . of the Anglo-Saxons [vol. IV], relating to the language, literature, and music of the Anglo - Saxons; 339-43, notes on, and extracts from, [Walter] Scott's 'Lay of the Last Minstrel'; 359-62, extracts from a review of Edward Moor: The Hindu Pantheon which appeared in The Edinburgh Review, February 1811; 367-70, brief notes relating to the poetic dialect of the Welsh bards, the 'ancient [Welsh] Prose dialect', 'the modern [Welsh] literary Dialect', and 'The Venedotian Dialect' and its use in literature, and comments on the efforts of 'A Welsh (would-be literary) Society in London . . . to patronize the Welsh Language'; 373-80, notes relating to the introduction of Scaldic bardism into North Wales in the time of Gruffudd ap Cynan and the consequent disappearance of the old British bardism in that part of the country, the preservation of the old bardism in Glamorgan, and the invigorating effect of the 'Scaldic manner or system' on Welsh poetry and the Welsh language, general comments on the moral tone of Welsh literature, etc.; 381, three 'grammatical' triads; 382, a very brief list of Irish words in the Venedotian dialect; 383, an extract 'Ex Vol. 35 Plas Gwynn Mon' [i.e. Panton MS 35 now NLW MS 2003] relating to the 'dymchwelawl' poetic metre; 384, a note relating to an old manuscript volume containing Welsh miracle plays in the possession of 'Dr. Thomas yn Llwyn Iwrch' in the eighteenth century; 385-6, comments on the practice of calling 'the ancient British Religion Druidical'; 387-9, general observations on the development of the 'system of versification and of poetical criticism . . . of the Welsh Bards'; 390, a brief note on 'Bardism or Druidism'; 391-2, a list of fourteen chapter headings for a proposed 'History of the Bards' [? by Edward Williams], with a note at the beginning 'A Bad Plan' and at the end 'The above is only the first rude sketch of 1791 and here only retained as containing a few hints that may be useful' (in addition to material on British / Welsh bardism and druidism and Welsh music this work was to contain chapters on Irish and Highland bards, Scandinavian scalds, Provencal troubadours, and Saxon and English minstrels); 392-4, a list of thirty-six topics or subject or chapter headings being 'Another arrangement' [presumably for the proposed 'History of the Bards']; 395, a transcript of three 'englynion' attributed to Gutto'r Glyn, the third being attributed also to H[ywel] D[afydd] I[eua] n Rhys (an accompanying note mentions an 'eisteddfod' at Cardiff Castle); 396-7, a list of six 'Topics for the Bards Common Place book'; 398, a list of dates ? in connection with the holding of 'eisteddfodau' at Ystrad Ywain [co. Glamorgan]; 399-400, notes relating to the 'Polity or Discipline' of the druids and bards; 407, a list of fourteen 'names given by the ancient Bards to the Coronog faban' (part Welsh, part English, and derived from [Thomas] Pugh [: Brittish and Out-landish] Prophesies . . . [ London, 1658]); 408-18, notes relating largely to early British bardism and druidism with mention of [James] MacPherson and the Ossianic poems; 423-5, miscellaneous triads, etc.; 426 + 430-31, general reflections relating to etymology; 427-9, reflections on the use of conjecture in history particularly 'with respect to the peopling of Europe and America' if no historical records were available; 431-3, notes relating to the dissension between the bards of North Wales and those of Glamorgan consequent upon the 'succesful attempt of Daf[ydd] ab Edmund at the Caermarthen Congress [? 1451] to establish his own system [of versification]', the researches undertaken by the Glamorgan bards into 'Bardic history and science' and their discovery of 'the true principles of Poetry and versification', etc.; 435-7, notes containing general reflections on changes in the Welsh language and poetry from the late thirteenth century onwards; and 438, a list of six Welsh triads.

'Iolo Morganwg'.

Bardism,

A volume of notes in the hand of Edward Williams ('Iolo Morganwg') bearing the inscription 'History of the British Bards. Common Place Book. No. IV. By Edward Williams . . .' on the 'title-page'. Pp. 2- 11, 32-61, 70-103, 112-25 contain the text of an essay on various schools of Welsh poetry which, under the title 'History of the British Bards' and with the subtitles 'Primitive School', 'School of Taliesin', and 'School of Gruffudd ap Cynan alias of Glynn Achlach', was subsequently published in The Cambrian Journal, 1858, pp. 161-9, ibid., 1859, pp. 10-29, 132-41, 241-55, and ibid., 1860, pp. 7-21. Pp. 12-24 contain extracts from, and abstracts of sections of, two letters from Sharon Turner to the Reverend John Brand as secretary of the Society of Antiquaries which, under the headings 'An Inquiry respecting the early use of rhime . . .' and 'A further inquiry respecting the early use of rhime ...', were published in Archaeologia or Miscellaneous Tracts relating to Antiquity, vol. XIV, 1803, pp. 168-204. These extracts, etc., were published in The Cambrian Journal, 1858, pp. 353-63 being inserted there as a section of the aforementioned essay entitled 'History of the British Bards'. Pp. 26-7, 62-5, 126-31, 192- 203, 232-3 (each page headed 'Alphabet Bards. Allusions to') contain couplets or longer extracts from the works of Welsh poets, these apparently being presumed to contain references to the bardic practice of writing on wooden surfaces using the special alphabet allegedly used by the Welsh bards (see the preceding manuscript No. 13107B) or words and phrases whose metaphorical use reflected such a practice. The contents of other pages include p. 28 (headed 'Hu Gadarn'), two couplets of Welsh verse relating to Hu [Gadarn]; pp. 66-9 (each page headed 'Bards Discipline Miscellaneous'), extracts from the works of Welsh poets, etc., relating mainly to the bards of Tir Iarll; pp. 104-05, notes under the page headings 'Preface to the History of the Bards, Collections for' ( these notes also appear in The Cambrian Journal, 1860, pp. 10-11, as part of the abovementioned essay on the Welsh bards although they obviously do not form part of the narrative of the text of that essay); pp. 132-6 (each page headed 'Schools of Welsh Poetry [Primitive School]'), further observations relating to the primitive school of Welsh poets, its survival in Glamorgan until the seventeenth century, and the foundation of a new school of poets beginning with Rhys Goch ap Riccert, circa 1130, 'in the Silurian district of Wales'; pp. 137-43, blank except for page headings as in pp. 132-6; pp. 150-51, each page headed 'Ossian', otherwise blank; pp. 180-83 (each page headed 'Alliteration'), a note on the definition of the word alliteration, an analysis of an example of alliteration in English verse, examples of its use in 'Caedmon's Paraphrase on Genesis', and a brief note on its use by Saxon poets and its introduction into Welsh poetry; pp. 204-15, each page headed 'Institutes and customs alluded to', otherwise blank; pp. 216-23 (each page headed 'Mythologies'), a triad relating to the proper name Menw on p. 216, otherwise blank; and pp. 240- 41, each page headed 'Inquiries Miscellaneous', otherwise blank. On a 'fly- leaf' at the beginning of the volume are sketches of five musical instruments surrounded by a number of circles containing the names of grades of Welsh bards and musicians extracted 'from a MS. in the Havod Library, 1790'.

'Iolo Morganwg'.

Brut Aberpergwm, etc.,

A composite volume containing transcripts of historical and literary material in the hand of Edward Williams ('Iolo Morganwg'). Pp. 1 -74 contain one of the two known reputed transcripts by Edward Williams of the supposedly variant version of the medieval Welsh Chronicle of the Princes ('Brut y Tywysogion') which is generally known as 'Brut Aberpergwm' or 'The Gwentian Brut'. The superscription on p. 1 reads 'Llyma Vrut y Tywysogion val y bu Ryfeloedd a gweithredoedd enseiliaid a Dialeddau, a Rhyfeddodau gwedi eu tynnu or hen gofion cadwedig au blyneddu'n Drefnedig gan Garadawc Llancarfan', and, according to a note at the end of the text (p. 74), the present copy was transcribed by Iorwerth ab Iorwerth Gwilym, i.e. Edward Williams, in 1790 from one of the manuscripts of the Reverend Thomas Richards, curate of Llangrallo [co. Glamorgan], who, in turn, had copied the work in 1764 from one of the manuscripts in the possession of George Williams, esq., of Aberpergwm [co. Glamorgan]. This is substantially the text that was published in The Myvyrian Archaiology of Wales . . ., vol. II, 1801, pp. 468-582, and also in Aneurin Owen (ed.): Brut y Tywysogion; the Gwentian Chronicle of Caradoc of Llancarvan . . . (London, 1863), this second publication being accompanied by an English translation. P. 89 is inscribed 'English Translation of Caradoc of Lancarvan's Annals of the Princes of Wales. By Edward Williams. 1807. Rough Copy'. The section now paginated 101-88 contains an English translation of the text found in pp. 1-74. Other items in the volume include pp. 191-208, extracts from William Warrington: The History of Wales . . . (London, 1786); 215-19, a draft copy of the last three paragraphs of the preface to The Myvyrian Archaiology . . ., vol. II, in which the text of 'Brut Aberpergwm' was published (see G. J. Williams: op. cit., pp. 206-08); 223-5, a transcript of the opening paragraphs of a version of the Laws of Hywel Dda; and 233- 43, copies of poems by [Edward Williams] 'Iolo Morganwg'.

'Iolo Morganwg'.

Brut Ieuan Brechfa; Brut Aberpergwm; triads, etc.

A composite volume containing miscellaneous historical and literary material in the hand of Edward Williams ('Iolo Morganwg'). Pp. 24-36 contain a transcript of a version of the medieval Welsh Chronicle of the Princes associated with the name of the fifteenth century poet and genealogist Ieuan Brechfa with the title or superscription 'Brut y Tywysogion . . . a dynnwyd o Lyfrau Caradawc Llancarfan ac eraill o hen Lyfrau Cyfarwyddyd a ysgrifenodd Ieuan Brechfa'. The transcript was allegedly made by Edward Williams from a volume in the possession of Rhys Thomas, printer, of Cowbridge, and the text was published in The Myvyrian Archaiology of Wales, vol. II, 1801, pp. 470-565 (bottom section of pages). Pp. 37-135 contain one of the two known reputed transcripts by Edward Williams of the allegedly variant version of the aforesaid Welsh Chronicle of the Princes known as 'Brut Aberpergwm' or the 'Gwentian Brut'. The title or superscription reads 'Llyma Vrut y Tywysogion val y bu Ryfeloedd a Gweithredoedd enseiliaid a Dialeddau a Rhyfeddodau gwedi eu tynnu o'r hen gofion cadwedig a'u blynyddu'n drefnedig gan Garadawc Llancarfan', and the text was reputedly transcribed by [Edward Williams] 'Iorwerth Gwilym' in 1790 from one of the manuscripts of the Reverend Thomas Richards, curate of Llangrallo [co. Glamorgan], who, in turn, had reputedly copied the work in 1764 from a manuscript in the possession of George Wiliams of Aber Pergwm [co. Glamorgan] (see p. 135). For the other reputed transcript of this text allegedly from the same source see NLW MS 13113B (Llanover C. 26) above. Other items in the volume include pp. 13-18, variant versions of parts of the introductory section to Lewis Dwnn's Visitations (see S. R. Meyrick (ed.): Heraldic Visitations of Wales . . . by Lewys Dwnn (Llandovery, 1846), pp. 7 and 9); 18-20, a list of eleven Welsh writers who had recorded the genealogies and deeds of the Welsh ('sgrifennyddion a gadwasant gof am achau a gweithredoedd y Cymry') allegedly copied from a book in the possession of Ben Simon 'y Bardd o Borth Myrddin'; 20-24, a further list of twenty Welsh poets or writers who had written about Wales and the island of Britain ('Enwau'r Prydyddion Awdurdodol . . . a ysgrifenasant am Wlad Gymru ac am Ynys Prydain') (see IM, t. 308); 136-7, a note by [Edward Williams] 'Iolo Morganwg' in 1801 on the attribution of works to ancient writers and poets such as Caradawc o Lancarfan, Taliesin, etc.; 138-57, another account of the quarrels between Iestin fab Gwrgan, lord of Glamorgan, and Rhys fab Tudur, prince of South Wales, and between the said Iestin and Einion ab Collwyn, the invitation to Sir Rhobert fab Hamon and the Norman knights to intervene, the consequent conquest of Glamorgan by the Normans, and the division of the country between Sir Rhobert and his twelve knights, with brief notes on the subsequent holders of the thirteen original divisions ('Hanes y Tri Marchog ar Ddeg a ddaethant i Forganwg yn Amser Iestin ab Gwrgan', allegedly transcribed from a volume in the possession of the Reverend Thos. Basset of Lann y Lai, co. Glamorgan); 158- 61, notes on variations in a second version of the account of the conquest of Glamorgan (pp. 138-57) to be found in the aforesaid Mr. Bassett's volume; 163-4, a list of Glamorgan bards with the places where they lived; 179 + 182, a brief chronicle of historical and pseudo-historical events in British history, 2nd - 5th century A.D.; 183, notes on an 'eisteddfod' held at Carmarthen in the time of Rhys ab Tewdur; 191-4, notes on Sir Robert Fitzhamon and his twelve knights and 'chronological notes from the Encyclopaedia Britanica'; 195-223, transcripts of three series of triads with the superscriptions 'Trioedd Ynys Prydain o'r Delyn Ledr ymha Lyfr yr oeddent wedi eu hysgrifennu o Lyfr Mr. Robert Vaughan o Hengwrt' (91), 'Trioedd y Meirch' (11), and 'Llyma ychwaneg o Drioedd Ynys Prydain allan o Lyfr Mr. Robert Vaughan o Hengwrt' (4); 224, an anecdote relating to Maelgwn Gwynedd; 225-31, transcripts of Welsh verse attributed to Lewys Môn, Taliesin, and Cattwg ddoeth; 231-3, lists of proverbial or wisdom sayings headed 'Llyma Gynghorion Cattwg ddoeth', 'Llymma Goreuau Cattwg Sant ab Gwynlliw', and 'Llymma Goreuau Meugant Bardd Cystenin Fendigaid'; 233-51, transcripts of series of triads with the superscriptions 'Llyma Drioedd a gant Iolo Morganwg', 'Trioedd Cattwg Sant', 'Llymma Drioedd a dalant eu hystyrio cyn gwreicca', 'Llymma Drioedd y Gwragedd priod', and 'Llyma Drioedd o hen Lyfr Lewys Hopcin'; 257-66, transcripts of Welsh poems and exemplary verse attributed to Mab claf i Lywarch, Y Cwtta Cyfarwydd, and Dafydd Nanmor; 271-5, an incomplete series of triads (5 + part of 6) with the superscription 'Llymma Drioedd Cof Cyfarwydd yn son am hynodion o wyr ac o betheu a fuant gynt yn Ynys Prydain . . .' (pp. 267-70, with p. 267 inscribed 'Trioedd Ynys Prydain o Lyfr Iaco ab Dewi gan Rys Thomas, Argraphydd, a fu gynt yn eiddo Twm Siôn Catti', were probably formerly the upper and lower covers of a home-made booklet intended to contain a version of the third series of 'Trioedd Ynys Prydain' of which the contents of pp. 271-5 are probably a fragmentary draft (see Rachel Bromwich: 'Trioedd Ynys Prydain' in Welsh Literature and Scholarship (Cardiff, 1969), p. 13)); 287-300, an alphabetical list of old Welsh words with modern equivalents; 303-09, brief notes headed 'Some account of the Welsh Bards'; 315-17, etymological and other miscellaneous notes; 318, transcripts of a short series of Welsh triads called 'Trioedd yr Addurneu' and of four 'englynion' attributed to [Edward Williams] 'Iolo Morganwg'; 319, a brief note relating to ? Nonconformist meetings associated with Blaen Gwrach [co. Glamorgan]; 327-34, a transcript of the poem 'Kad Goddeu' attributed to Taliesin; 335-8 notes relating to a Unitarian society called 'Gwyr Cwm y Felin' which allegedly flourished at Cwrn y Felin, co. Glamorgan, in the eighteenth century with a reference to Edward Williams's attitude to Unitarianism (see TLLM, tt. 215, 239, 314, and IM, t. 73); (continued)

339-47, notes relating to developments in Welsh metrics and literature to the late eighteenth century; 349-50, notes on the 'Cimmerii' or 'Cimbri', etc.; 351, a note on the connection between the freemasons and St. Alban; 352, a list of the princes of Glamorgan from the time of Aedd Mawr to the time of Iestin ap Gwrgan; 363-5, transcripts of two poems attributed to Morgan Talhai 'o Lansanffraid Fawr ym Morganwg'; 371-4, historical memoranda relating to Gower including an incomplete list of the lords of Gower from the time of Henry I onwards; 375-82, etymological and historical notes relating to the names and regions of Gwent / Essyllwg / Morganwg (mention of 'Ragland Castle Library, the best collection of old Welsh MSS. that ever existed'); 383-4, a note on the possible antiquity of the period of the formation of the Welsh language; 384-90, miscellaneous poetic and other extracts mainly Welsh, and lists of the names of the months in Armoric and Cornish; 393-4 a transcript of an eight-stanza English poem by Taliesin Williams 'written at the Lamb and Flag, Vale of Neath, 1816'; 401-03, a draft copy of an advertisement for the proposed publication of a Welsh quarterly magazine to be called 'Goleugrawn Deheubarth', the first issue to appear in June 1818; 407-11, extracts from [William] Coxe: [An Historical Tour in] Mon[mouth]shire . . . (London, 1801), part 11, appendix 1; 415-18, a copy of a tale relating to King Arthur and his knights sleeping in a cave full of treasure at Craig y Ddinas; 419-22, extracts from [P. H.] Mallet [: Northern Antiquities . . .] and the works of Caedmon; 423-30, notes headed 'Plan of the Analytical Dissertation on the Welsh Language by E[dward] W[illiams]'; 431-5, brief notes relating to the cultivation of literary languages and 'the mode of examining or investigating the principles on which any language has been formed'; 436, a brief list of the 'numerous names of God' in Welsh; 440 + 453, notes relating to ? earth tremors in the area between Cowbridge and the sea in July and August 1809; 445-8, notes headed 'Preface to History of the Bards - hints', with references to the work of [Edward] Jones ['Bardd y Brenin']; 455-7, extracts from [George] Lytte[l]ton : [The] History of [the Life of King] Henry the Second; 457-9, miscellaneous triads; 460-61, extracts from poems by Tudur Aled and G[uto'r] Glyn to abbots of Lanegwystl; 471-82, two sets of notes headed 'On Welsh Literature. Miscellaneous' and 'Cardigan and North Pembroke Dialects' containing general observations on the nature, etc., of Welsh literature and the Welsh language with references to classes held for learning to read Welsh; 482-6, notes on a reputed Welsh bard 'Keraint Vardd Glas otherwise Y Bardd Glas Keraint seemingly the Glaskerion of Chaucer'; 487-91, copies of two rhetorical prose exercises in the form of two love-letters in Welsh addressed by a member of the Powel family of Llwydiarth [co. Glamorgan] to a young lady; 491-500, a brief sketch in Welsh of the history of Morgannwg from the time of Morgan Mwynfawr to the time of the Tudors reputedly from a volume once in the possession of the Reverend Mr. Gamais (Gamage), vicar of St. Athan [co. Glamorgan], and then in the possession of Mr. John Spencer of the same parish; 501-05, transcripts of two letters reputedly exchanged between the sixteenth century poets Siôn Mowddwy and Meirig Dafydd concerning criticism by the latter of the former's verse, mention being made by Meirig Dafydd of the rival Welsh strict-metre systems of Dafydd Emwnt and the bards of Morgannwg (for references to manuscript and published versions of these letters see IMCY, t. 167, and TLLM, t. 86, n. 26-7, and for the opinion that Meirig Dafydd's reply was composed by Edward Williams himself see TLLM, t. 78, n. 6, and t. 86); 505, 'Llyma bump Tywysawglwyth Cymru'; 507- 12, an incomplete list of twenty four early kings of Britain recounting their feats and accomplishments ('Hanes Pedwar Brenin ar hugain a varnwyd yn henna ac yn wrola o'r Brutaniaid i Ddeiliaid ag i Gwncwerio'); 513-16, notes on the lineage of Iestyn ap Gwrgan ('Llyma wehelyth Iestyn ap Gwrgan un o bump Brenhinllwyth Cymru a Phen hynaif Tywysogion Ynys Prydain' reputedly 'o Lyfr Thomas Hopkin o Langrallo'); etc. In three instances notes have been written on the blank verso or margins of printed copies of the following - an abstract of a report on a meeting, May 1820, of the governors and friends of the medical charitable organisation known as the Welsh Dispensary (171-8), proposals for publishing Edward Williams's two volumes of English verse Poems Lyric and Pastoral in 1792 (180-81), and an advertisement for letting 'a desirable family residence' in Cardiff (184-5).

'Iolo Morganwg'.

Cyfrinach beirdd ynys Prydain,

A volume written by Edward Williams, 'Iolo Morganwg', and containing a copy of 'Cyfrinach Beirdd Ynys Prydain' which is very similar to, but not identical with, the text published in 1829, pp. 1-171 (cf. I. A. Williams MS 33A). On the outside of the cover are the words 'Cyfrinach Beirdd Ynys Prydain, (?) 1470, Rhol I . . .', and sewn in at the beginning are draft proposals for printing the work ('Cynnygiad i argraphu drwy gynhorthwy, Cyfrinach Beirdd Ynys Prydain . . .'). The pages now numbered [v-viii] were written after the main body of the manuscript and contain a note concerning Sir Richard Bassett and his descendants, a list of 'Cyhydeddau Sion Dafydd Rhys', 'Cyhydeddau Simwnt Fychan', and 'Colofnau Cerdd Dafod', and a title-page for the edition of 'Cyfrinach Beirdd Ynys Prydain' which was to have appeared in 1822; there are some later additions and interlineations elsewhere also in the volume. Both black ink and red ink have been used in the manuscript and pasted on to p. [x] is a line-engraving described as 'Y Coronog Faban' with the following note by Iolo Morganwg: 'Mr. Basire - "Too Good to have been by any known artist but Albert Durer", it is says he a "wood cut". Inside the back cover is a list, with page references, headed 'Rhai o'r Cynhwysiadau.'

'Iolo Morganwg'.

Diarhebion, etc.,

A composite volume containing lists of Welsh proverbs, popular or traditional sayings, etc., in the hand of Edward Williams ('Iolo Morganwg'). A square piece of paper pasted on to p. 21 is inscribed 'Diarhebion Morganwg Cynnulliad Iolo Morganwg Drwy Gorph mwy na Hanner Canmlynedd, o Lafar Penn Gwlad a Llyfrau Argraff ac Ysgrif . . . Mai'r 9fed 1801'. Pp. 33-180 contain a collection, arranged in alphabetical order, of Welsh proverbs and popular sayings which, according to the 'title-page' (p. 23) and 'preface' (pp. 25- 32) to this section, Edward Williams had heard in Glamorganshire during a period of thirty years and had arranged and listed in the alphabetical order in which they appear in the present volume in 1800. P. 197 is inscribed 'Diarhebion Cymreig a gasglwyd o Amrafaelion Leoedd sef o hen ysgrifeniadau, Llyfrau mwy diweddar, ag o Ben Gwlad, Gan Iolo Morganwg, 1796', and is followed by the following items - pp. 199-246, a collection, arranged in alphabetical order, of Welsh proverbs and popular or traditional sayings which, according to the superscription and a note at the end, had been extracted from a volume in the possession of [Owen Jones ] 'Owain Myfyr o Lundain' in May 1797; p. 247, a version of the Lord's Prayer in Welsh rhyming verse attributed to Cattwg Ddoeth (see The Myvyrian Archaiology of Wales . . ., vol. III, 1807, p. 5); pp. 247-58, series of Welsh precepts, advisory sayings, proverbs, etc., some in rhyming verse, attributed to Cattwg Ddoeth (see ibid., pp. 5-9, 27, 47-9, 56), and a list of 'Dewis bethau Talhaearn Fardd'; pp. 259-71, a series of Welsh triads with the superscription 'Trioedd Cattwg Ddoeth' (see ibid., pp. 69-75); and pp. 271-4, further series of Welsh 'sayings', etc. (see ibid., pp. 25-7, 47-9, 75-6). Occasionally the proverbs, etc., in the two main lists noted above are accompanied by notes in English or Latin 'equivalents'.

'Iolo Morganwg'.

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